William Wordsworth

1770 - 1850

A Quote by William Wordsworth on dreams and glory

Where is it now, the glory and the dream?

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Intimations of Immortality. Stanza 5.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on birth, glory, god, heaven, home, lies, life, sleep, and soul

Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting: The soul that rises with us, our life's star, Hath had elsewhere its setting, And cometh from afar. Not in entire forgetfulness, And not in utter nakedness, But trailing clouds of glory, do we come From God, who is our home: Heaven lies about us in our infancy.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Intimations of Immortality. Stanza 5.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on death and good

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The good die first, And they whose hearts are dry as summer dust Burn to the socket.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book i.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on men

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Men are we, and must grieve when even the shade Of that which once was great is passed away.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: On the Extinction of the Venetian Republic.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on good, happiness, and heaven

But who, if he be called upon to face Some awful moment to which Heaven has joined Great issues, good or bad for humankind, Is happy as a lover.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Character of the Happy Warrior.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on earth, growth, motherhood, and tears

The common growth of Mother Earth Suffices me,-her tears, her mirth, Her humblest mirth and tears.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Peter Bell. Prologue, Stanza 27.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on bliss, company, dance, heart, lies, loneliness, pleasure, poets, solitude, thought, and wealth

I wander'd lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the Milky Way, They stretch'd in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay; Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. The waves beside them danced; but they Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: A poet could not but be gay, In such a jocund company: I gazed-and gazed-but little thought What wealth the show to me had brought: For oft, when on my couch I lie In vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills; And dances with the daffodils.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on death

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One of those heavenly days that cannot die.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Nutting.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on death and faith

We must be free or die who speak the tongue That Shakespeare spake, the faith and morals hold Which Milton held.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: It is not to be thought of.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on memory

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Meek Walton's heavenly memory.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Part iii. v. Walton's Book of Lives.

Contributed by: Zaady

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