William Wordsworth

1770 - 1850

A Quote by William Wordsworth on deed, gratitude, kindness, and men

I 've heard of hearts unkind, kind deeds With coldness still returning; Alas! the gratitude of men Hath oftener left me mourning.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Simon Lee.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on good, kindness, life, and love

That best portion of a good man's life,- His little, nameless, unremembered acts Of kindness and of love.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Lines completed a few miles above Tintern Abbey.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on heaven and home

Type of the wise who soar but never roam, True to the kindred points of heaven and home.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: To a Skylark.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on earth, heaven, loneliness, mortality, and power

Since every mortal power of Coleridge Was frozen at its marvellous source, The rapt one, of the godlike forehead, The heaven-eyed creature sleeps in earth: And Lamb, the frolic and the gentle, Has vanished from his lonely hearth.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Extempore Effusion upon the Death of James Hogg.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on conflict and laws

And through the heat of conflict keeps the law In calmness made, and sees what he foresaw.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Character of the Happy Warrior.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on nature and teachers

Come forth into the light of things, Let Nature be your teacher.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Tables Turned.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on guidance

A light to guide, a rod To check the erring, and reprove.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Ode to Duty.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on perception

Minds that have nothing to confer Find little to perceive.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Yes, Thou art Fair.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on love

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And you must love him, ere to you He will seem worthy of your love.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: A Poet's Epitaph. Stanza 11.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on boredom, mind, and world

The sightless Milton, with his hair Around his placid temples curled; And Shakespeare at his side,-a freight, If clay could think and mind were weight, For him who bore the world!

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Italian Itinerant.

Contributed by: Zaady

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