William Wordsworth

1770 - 1850

A Quote by William Wordsworth on emotion, feeling, poetry, spontaneity, and tranquility

Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on divinity and vision

The vision and the faculty divine; Yet wanting the accomplishment of verse.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book i.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on romance

in

Lady of the Mere, Sole-sitting by the shores of old romance.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: A narrow Girdle of rough Stones and Crags.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on gold and opportunity

Turning, for them who pass, the common dust Of servile opportunity to gold.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Desultory Stanza.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on birds

in

In this sequestered nook how sweet To sit upon my orchard seat And birds and flowers once more to greet. . . .

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on god and simplicity

Pan himself, The simple shepherd's awe-inspiring god!

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book iv.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on unhappiness

For old, unhappy, far-off things, And battles long ago.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Solitary Reaper.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on immortality and soul

Though inland far we be, Our souls have sight of that immortal sea Which brought us hither.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Intimations of Immortality. Stanza 9.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on past and thought

The thought of our past years in me doth breed Perpetual benediction.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Intimations of Immortality. Stanza 9.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on endurance, planning, reason, skill, strength, and women

The reason firm, the temperate will, Endurance, foresight, strength, and skill; A perfect woman, nobly planned, To warn, to comfort, and command.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: She was a Phantom of Delight.

Contributed by: Zaady

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