William Wordsworth

1770 - 1850

A Quote by William Wordsworth on fear, future, love, past, and purity

He spake of love, such love as spirits feel In worlds whose course is equable and pure; No fears to beat away, no strife to heal,- The past unsighed for, and the future sure.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Laodamia.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on learning and speech

Babylon, Learned and wise, hath perished utterly, Nor leaves her speech one word to aid the sigh That would lament her.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Ecclesiastical Sonnets. Part i. xxv. Missions and Travels.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth

A noticeable man, with large gray eyes.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Stanzas written in Thomson's Castle of Indolence.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on earth, heaven, and youth

A youth to whom was given So much of earth, so much of heaven.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Ruth.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on age and serenity

But an old age serene and bright, And lovely as a Lapland night, Shall lead thee to thy grave.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: To a Young Lady. Dear Child of Nature.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on history and nature

Those old credulities, to Nature dear, Shall they no longer bloom upon the stock Of history?

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Memorials of a Tour in Italy. iv.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on romance

in

Lady of the Mere, Sole-sitting by the shores of old romance.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: A narrow Girdle of rough Stones and Crags.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on gold and opportunity

Turning, for them who pass, the common dust Of servile opportunity to gold.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Desultory Stanza.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on birds

in

In this sequestered nook how sweet To sit upon my orchard seat And birds and flowers once more to greet. . . .

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on god and simplicity

Pan himself, The simple shepherd's awe-inspiring god!

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book iv.

Contributed by: Zaady

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