William Wordsworth

1770 - 1850

A Quote by William Wordsworth on imperfection, praise, and prayer

The imperfect offices of prayer and praise.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book i.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on charity and duty

The primal duties shine aloft, like stars; The charities that soothe and heal and bless Are scattered at the feet of man like flowers.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book ix.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on fear, future, love, past, and purity

He spake of love, such love as spirits feel In worlds whose course is equable and pure; No fears to beat away, no strife to heal,- The past unsighed for, and the future sure.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Laodamia.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on learning and speech

Babylon, Learned and wise, hath perished utterly, Nor leaves her speech one word to aid the sigh That would lament her.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Ecclesiastical Sonnets. Part i. xxv. Missions and Travels.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on belief, faith, intuition, passion, and persuasion

One in whom persuasion and belief Had ripened into faith, and faith become A passionate intuition.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book iv.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on cheerfulness, dawn, and time

She was a phantom of delight When first she gleamed upon my sight, A lovely apparition, sent To be a moment's ornament; Her eyes as stars of twilight fair, Like twilights too her dusky hair, But all things else about her drawn From May-time and the cheerful dawn.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: She was a Phantom of Delight.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on mind

in

In years that bring the philosophic mind.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Intimations of Immortality. Stanza 10.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on pleasure, pride, and sorrow

Never to blend our pleasure or our pride With sorrow of the meanest thing that feels.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Hart-leap Well. Part ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on emotion, feeling, poetry, spontaneity, and tranquility

Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on divinity and vision

The vision and the faculty divine; Yet wanting the accomplishment of verse.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book i.

Contributed by: Zaady

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