William Wordsworth

1770 - 1850

A Quote by William Wordsworth on happy, warrior, pain, compassionate, sacrifice, and wordsworth

It is the generous Spirit, who, when brought
Among the tasks of real life, hath wrought
Upon the plan that pleased his boyish thought:
Whose high endeavours are an inward light
That makes the path before him always bright:
Who, with a natural instinct to discern
What knowledge can perform, is diligent to learn;
Abides by this resolve, and stops not there,
But makes his moral being his prime care;
Who, doomed to go in company with Pain,
And Fear, and Bloodshed, miserable train!
Turns his necessity to glorious gain;
In face of these doth exercise a power
Which is our human nature's highest dower;
Controls them and subdues, transmutes, bereaves
Of their bad influence, and their good receives:
By objects, which might force the soul to abate
Her feeling, rendered more compassionate;
Is placable--because occasions rise
So often that demand such sacrifice;
More skilful in self-knowledge, even more pure,
As tempted more; more able to endure,
As more exposed to suffering and distress;
Thence, also, more alive to tenderness.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Character of the Happy Warrior

Contributed by: Jeff.Mowatt

A Quote by William Wordsworth on hope, effort, expectation, and desire

With hope it is, hope that can never die,
Effort, and expectation, and desire,
And something evermore about to be.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Prelude

Contributed by: Susan

A Quote by William Wordsworth on habit, reflection, reflecting, and herd

Habit rules the unreflecting herd.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: www.quotegarden.com

Contributed by: Anu

A Quote by William Wordsworth

The best portion of a good man's life,
His little, nameless, unremembered acts,
Of kindness and of love.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Contributed by: Kaeru

A Quote by William Wordsworth on thought

in

We meet thee, like a pleasant thought, When such are wanted.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: To the Daisy.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on boredom

in

With battlements that on their restless fronts Bore stars.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on blessings

All that we behold is full of blessings.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on charm, feeling, interest, love, mountains, needs, passion, and thought

The sounding cataract Haunted me like a passion; the tall rock, The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, An appetite; a feeling and a love that had no need of a remoter charm by thought supplied, nor any interest Unborrowed from the eye.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on boredom, heart, and music

The music in my heart I bore Long after it was heard no more.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Solitary Reaper.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on birth, earth, and glory

The sunshine is a glorious birth; But yet I know, where'er I go, That there hath passed away a glory from the earth.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Intimations of Immortality. Stanza 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

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