William Shakespeare

1564 - 1616

A Quote by William Shakespeare on world

in

Why, then the world's mine oyster, Which I with sword will open.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Merry Wives of Windsor, Act 2, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on christmas, desires, seasons, and wishes

At Christmas I no more desire a rose Than wish a snow in May's new-fangled mirth; But like of each thing that in season grows.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Love's Labours Lost, Act 1, scene 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on thinking

I can no longer live by thinking.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act 5, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on good and thinking

There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act II, scene ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on danger and men

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He thinks too much. Such men are dangerous.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Act 1, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on faults

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A friendly eye could never see such faults.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Caesar, Act 4, scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare

It is a heretic that makes the fire, Not she that burns in 't.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Winter’s Tale

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on contentment and heart

My crown is in my heart, not on my head; Not deck'd with diamonds and Indian stones, Nor to be seen: my crown is call'd content; A crown it is that seldom kings enjoy.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry VI, Part iii, Act 3, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on cruelty and kindness

I must be cruel only to be kind.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 3, Scene 4

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on joy

in

How much better is it to weep at joy than to joy at weeping?

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, Act 1, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

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