William Hazlitt

1778 - 1830

A Quote by William Hazlitt on people and silence

The most silent people are generally those who think most highly of themselves.

William Hazlitt (1778 - 1830)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Hazlitt on conceit

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We can bear to be deprived of everything but our self-conceit.

William Hazlitt (1778 - 1830)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Hazlitt

The most fluent talkers or most plausible reasoners are not always the justest thinkers.

William Hazlitt (1778 - 1830)

Source: Sketches and Essays, On Prejudice

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A Quote by William Hazlitt on art

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The art of pleasing consists in being pleased.

William Hazlitt (1778 - 1830)

Source: Round Table.

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A Quote by William Hazlitt on pleasure and promises

Some persons make promises for the pleasure of breaking them.

William Hazlitt (1778 - 1830)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Hazlitt on adversity, prosperity, and teachers

Prosperity is a great teacher; adversity a greater.

William Hazlitt (1778 - 1830)

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A Quote by William Hazlitt on order

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We must overact our part in some measure, in order to produce any effect at all.

William Hazlitt (1778 - 1830)

Source: "On Cant and Hypocrisy"

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A Quote by William Hazlitt on hope, neighbors, and people

The most insignificant people are the most apt to sneer at others. They are safe from reprisals, and have no hope of rising in their own esteem but by lowering their neighbors.

William Hazlitt (1778 - 1830)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Hazlitt on insults

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The best way to procure insults is to submit to them.

William Hazlitt (1778 - 1830)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Hazlitt on affection, boldness, darkness, discovery, genius, habits, meaning, mind, mystery, nature, originality, power, spirit, truth, and world

He is a man of capacity who possesses considerable intellectual riches: while he is a man of genius who finds out a vein of new ore. Originality is the seeing nature differently from others, and yet as it is in itself. It is not singularity or affectation, but the discovery of new and valuable truth. All the world do not see the whole meaning of any object they have been looking at. Habit blinds them to some things: shortsightedness to others. Every mind is not a gauge and measure of truth. Nature has her surface and her dark recesses. She is deep, obscure, and infinite. It is only minds on whom she makes her fullest impressions that can penetrate her shrine or unveil her Holy of Holies. It is only those whom she has filled with her spirit that have the boldness or the power to reveal her mysteries to others.

William Hazlitt (1778 - 1830)

Contributed by: Zaady

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