William Faulkner

1897 - 1962

A Quote by William Faulkner on acceptance, belief, compassion, courage, death, duty, endurance, glory, heart, honor, hope, immortality, literature, needs, newspapers, originality, past, pity, poets, pride, privilege, sacrifice, soul, spirit, and time

I decline to accept the end of man. It is easy enough to say that man is immortal simply because he will endure: that when the last ding-dong of doom has clanged and faded from the last worthless rock hanging tideless in the last red and dying evening, that even then there will still be one more sound: that of his puny inexhaustible voice, still talking. I refuse to accept this. I believe that man will not merely endure: he will prevail. He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance. The poet's, the writer's, duty is to write about these things. It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past. The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man, it can be one of the props, the pillars to help him endure and prevail. WILLIAM FAULKNER, address upon receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, Sweden, December 10, 1950. - Faulkner, Essays, Speeches & Public Letters, p. 120 (1951). This text is from Faulkner's original typescript; it was slightly revised from that which he delivered in Stockholm, and which was published in American newspapers at the time (p. 121).

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the original draft of speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on despair, fighting, illusions, and victory

. . . no battle is ever won . . . they are not even fought. The field only reveals to man his own folly and despair, and Victory is an illusion of philosophers and fools.

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: The Sound and the Fury

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on understanding

"Gettysburg. . . . You cant understand it. You would have to be born there."

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: Absalom, Absalom!

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on darkness and thought

"Why do you hate the South? I dont hate it. . . . I dont hate it. . . . I dont hate it he thought, panting in the cold air, the iron New England dark; I dont. I dont! I dont hate it! I dont hate it! "

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: Absalom, Absalom!

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner

Too much happens. . . . Man performs, engenders, so much more than he can or should have to bear. That's how he finds that he can bear anything. . . . That's what's so terrible.

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: Light in August

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on belief

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I believe that man not merely endure: he will prevail.

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the Speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on colors, equality, life, and world

To live anywhere in the world today and be against equality because of race or color, is like living in Alaska and being against snow.

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on aim, art, and life

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The aim of every artist is to arrest motion, which is life, by artificial means and hold it fixed so that a hundred years later, when a stranger looks at it, it moves again since it is life.

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Contributed by: Zaady

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