William Faulkner

1897 - 1962

A Quote by William Faulkner on dreams and wisdom

The end of wisdom is to dream high enough to lose the dream in the seeking of it.

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on labor and privilege

A mule will labor for ten years willingly and patiently for you, for the privilege of kicking you once.

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on compassion, endurance, immortality, poets, sacrifice, soul, spirit, and writers

He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance. See other 'Poets & Writers'

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the Speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on compassion, heart, honor, love, pity, poets, sacrifice, teaching, and writers

He [the writer] must, teach himself that the basest of all things is to be afraid; and, teaching himself that, forget it forever, leaving no room in his workshop for anything but the old verities and truths of the heart, the old universal truths lacking which any story is ephemeral and doomed - love and honor and pity and compassion and sacrifice. See Poets & Writers

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the Speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on compassion, courage, glory, heart, honor, hope, needs, past, pity, poets, pride, privilege, sacrifice, and writers

It is his [the poet's, the writer's] privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past. The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man, it can be one of the props, the pillars to help him endure and prevail. See Poets & Writers

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the Speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on justice

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Don't bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself.

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on children, commitment, crime, desires, ignorance, innocence, and people

When grown people speak of the innocence of children, they don't really know what they mean. Pressed, they will go a step further and say, Well, ignorance then. The child is neither. There is no crime which a boy of eleven had not envisaged long ago. His only innocence is, he may not yet be old enough to desire the fruits of it . . . his ignorance is, he does not know how to commit it.

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on bravery and cowardice

Be scared. You can't help that. But don't be afraid. Ain't nothing in the woods going to hurt you unless you corner it, or it smells that you are afraid. A bear or a deer, too, has got to be scared of a coward the same as a brave man has got to be.

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on needs, pride, and religion

It's not when you realize that nothing can help you - religion, pride, anything - it's when you realize that you don't need any aid.

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: Light in August

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on acceptance, belief, compassion, courage, death, duty, endurance, glory, heart, honor, hope, immortality, literature, needs, newspapers, originality, past, pity, poets, pride, privilege, sacrifice, soul, spirit, and time

I decline to accept the end of man. It is easy enough to say that man is immortal simply because he will endure: that when the last ding-dong of doom has clanged and faded from the last worthless rock hanging tideless in the last red and dying evening, that even then there will still be one more sound: that of his puny inexhaustible voice, still talking. I refuse to accept this. I believe that man will not merely endure: he will prevail. He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance. The poet's, the writer's, duty is to write about these things. It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past. The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man, it can be one of the props, the pillars to help him endure and prevail. WILLIAM FAULKNER, address upon receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, Sweden, December 10, 1950. - Faulkner, Essays, Speeches & Public Letters, p. 120 (1951). This text is from Faulkner's original typescript; it was slightly revised from that which he delivered in Stockholm, and which was published in American newspapers at the time (p. 121).

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the original draft of speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

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