William Cowper

1731 - 1800

A Quote by William Cowper on love, mercy, and sons

Ye therefore who love mercy, teach your sons to love it, too.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: The Winter Walk at Noon

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on absence, mind, and rest

Absence of occupation is not rest, A mind quite vacant is a mind distress'd.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: Retirement

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper

Feels himself spent and fumbles for his brains.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: Table Talk

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on indolence and thought

In indolent vacuity of thought.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: The Winter Evening

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on bliss, kiss, and soul

Perhaps thou gav'st me, though unseen, a kiss; Perhaps a tear, if souls can weep in bliss.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: On the Receipt of My Mother’s Picture

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on heart, mind, soul, and sympathy

There is in souls a sympathy with sounds; And as the mind is pitch'd, the ear is pleased With melting airs or martial, brisk, or grave; Some chord in unison with what we hear Is touch'd within us, and the heart replies.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: The Winter Walk at Noon

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on happiness and nature

Happiness depends, as Nature shows, Less on exterior things than most suppose.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: Table Talk. Line 246.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on humility, knowledge, learning, and wisdom

Knowledge is proud that he has learn'd so much; Wisdom is humble that he knows no more.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: The Winter Walk at Noon

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on day and life

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Beware of desperate steps; the darkest day, Lived till tomorrow, will have passed away.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: Retirement

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on home

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How much a dunce that has been sent to roam Excels a dunce that has been kept at home!

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: The Progress of Error. Line 415.

Contributed by: Zaady

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