William Cowper

1731 - 1800

A Quote by William Cowper

He would not, with a peremptory tone, Assert the nose upon his face his own.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: Conversation. Line 121.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on god and nature

in

Nature is but a name for an effect, Whose cause is God.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: The Winter Walk at Noon

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on dance, nature, and power

Nature, exerting an unwearied power, Forms, opens, and gives scent to every flower; Spreads the fresh verdure of the field, and leads The dancing Naiads through the dewy meads.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: Table Talk. Line 690.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on birth and nature

Ages elapsed ere Homer's lamp appear'd, And ages ere the Mantuan swan was heard: To carry nature lengths unknown before, To give a Milton birth, ask'd ages more.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: Table Talk. Line 556.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on difficulty and life

A life of ease is a difficult pursuit.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on world

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Lights of the world, and stars of human race.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: The Progress of Error. Line 97.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on complaints, grace, love, and weakness

Lord, it is my chief complaint, That my love is weak and faint; Yet I love thee and adore, Oh for grace to love thee more!

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: Olney Hymns

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on ambition and praise

Low ambition and the thirst of praise.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: Table Talk. Line 591.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on genius and wit

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Manner is all in all, whate'er is writ, The substitute for genius, sense, and wit.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: Table Talk. Line 542.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on day, forgiveness, and pity

The kindest and the happiest pair Will find occasion to forbear; And something, every day they live, To pity, and perhaps forgive.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Contributed by: Zaady

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