Wilfred Owen

1893 - 1918

A Quote by Wilfred Owen on beauty, dawn, gold, heaven, songs, and spirituality

Winter Song The browns, the olives, and the yellows died, And were swept up to heaven; where they glowed Each dawn and set of sun till Christmastide, And when the land lay pale for them, pale-snowed, Fell back, and down the snow-drifts flamed and flowed. From off your face, into the winds of winter, The sun-brown and the summer-gold are blowing; But they shall gleam with spiritual glinter, When paler beauty on your brows falls snowing, And through those snows my looks shall be soft-going.

Wilfred Owen (1893 - 1918)

Source: Winter Song

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wilfred Owen on boldness, bravery, day, death, dreams, home, improvement, justice, laughter, murder, stupidity, war, and wives

The Dead-Beat He dropped, - more sullenly than wearily, Lay stupid like a cod, heavy like meat, And none of us could kick him to his feet; -Just blinked at my revolver, blearily; -Didn't appear to know a war was on, Or see the blasted trench at which he stared. 'I'll do 'em in,' he whined, 'if this hand's spared, I'll murder them, I will.' A low voice said, 'It's Blighty, p'raps, he sees; his pluck's all gone, Dreaming of all the valiant, that aren't dead: Bold uncles, smiling ministerially; Maybe his brave young wife, getting her fun In some new home, improved materially. It's not these stiffs have crazed him; nor the Hun.' We sent him down at last, out of the way. Unwounded; - stout lad, too, before that strafe. Malingering? Stretcher-bearers winked, 'Not half!' Next day I heard the Doc.'s well-whiskied laugh: 'That scum you sent last night soon died. Hooray!'

Wilfred Owen (1893 - 1918)

Source: The Dead-Beat

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wilfred Owen on death, heaven, laughter, life, murder, myth, and soldiers

The Young Soldier It is not death Without hereafter To one in dearth Of life and its laughter, Nor the sweet murder Dealt slow and even Unto the martyr Smiling at heaven: It is the smile Faint as a (waning) myth, Faint, and exceeding small On a boy's murdered mouth.

Wilfred Owen (1893 - 1918)

Source: The Young Soldier

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wilfred Owen on art, awareness, beauty, birds, body, children, death, fatherhood, gold, happiness, heart, hope, laughter, learning, meaning, men, words, world, and youth

Sonnet: To a Child Sweet is your antique body, not yet young; Beauty withheld from youth that looks for youth; Fair only for your father. Dear among Masters in art. To all men else uncouth; Save me, who know your smile comes very old, Learnt of the happy dead that laughed with gods; For earlier suns than ours have lent you gold; Sly fauns and trees have given you jigs and nods. But soon your heart, hot-beating like a bird's, Shall slow down. Youth shall lop your hair; And you must learn wry meanings in our words. Your smile shall dull, because too keen aware; And when for hopes your hand shall be uncurled, Your eyes shall close, being open to the world.

Wilfred Owen (1893 - 1918)

Source: Sonnet: To a Child

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wilfred Owen on anger and death

What passing-bells, for these who die as cattle? Only the monstrous anger of the guns. Only the stuttering rifles rapid rattle Can patter out their hasty orisons.

Wilfred Owen (1893 - 1918)

Source: Anthem for Doomed Youth

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wilfred Owen on anger, death, good, patience, tenderness, and youth

Anthem for Doomed Youth What passing-bells for these who die as cattle? Only the monstrous anger of the guns. Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle Can patter out their hasty orisons. No mockeries for them; no prayers nor bells, Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs, - The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells; And bugles calling for them from sad shires. What candles may be held to speed them all? Not in the hands of boys, but in their eyes Shall shine the holy glimmers of good-byes. The pallor of girls' brows shall be their pall; Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds, And each slow dusk a drawing-down of blinds

Wilfred Owen (1893 - 1918)

Source: Anthem for Doomed Youth

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wilfred Owen on achievement, earth, home, kindness, and sleep

Futility Move him into the sun - Gently its touch awoke him once, At home, whispering of fields unsown. Always it woke him, even in France, Until this morning and this snow. If anything might rouse him now The kind old sun will know. Think how it wakes the seeds, - Woke, once, the clays of a cold star. Are limbs, so dear-achieved, are sides, Full-nerved -still warm -too hard to stir? Was it for this the clay grew tall? -O what made fatuous sunbeams toil To break earth's sleep at all?

Wilfred Owen (1893 - 1918)

Source: Futility

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wilfred Owen on lies, spirit, and war

Then, when much blood had clogged their chariot-wheels I would go up and wash them from sweet wells, Even with truths that lie too deep for taint. I would have poured my spirit without stint But not through wounds; not on the cess of war.

Wilfred Owen (1893 - 1918)

Source: Strange Meeting

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content