Warren Bennis

A Quote by Warren Bennis on leadership, openness, and transparency

I'd always rather err on the side of openness. But there's a difference between optimum and maximum openness, and fixing that boundary is a judgment call. The art of leadership is knowing how much information you're going to pass on -- to keep people motivated and to be as honest, as upfront, as you can. But, boy, there really are limits to that.

Warren Bennis

Source: An Interview with Warren Bennis: http://www.strategy-business.com/press/16635507/18276

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Warren Bennis on groups and leadership

How would you describe the leaders of great groups?
He or she is a pragmatic dreamer, a person with an original but attainable vision. Ironically, the leader is able to realise his or her dream only if others are free to do exceptional work. Typically, the leader is the one who recruits the others, by making the vision so palpable and seductive that they see it, too, and eagerly sign up. Inevitably, the leader has to invent a leadership style that suits the group. The standard models, especially command and control, simply don't work. The heads of groups have to act decisively, but never arbitrarily. They have to make decisions without limiting the perceived autonomy of the other participants. Devising and maintaining an atmosphere in which others can put a dent in the universe is the leader's creative act.

Warren Bennis

Source: INTERVIEW WITH WARREN BENNIS: http://www.managementskills.co.uk/articles/ap98-bennis.htm

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Warren Bennis on leaders, groups, and leadership

Without a terrific leader, you're not going to have a Great Group. But it is also true that you're not going to have a great leader without a Great Group.

Warren Bennis

Source: An Interview with Warren Bennis: http://www.strategy-business.com/press/16635507/18276

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Warren Bennis on groups, leadership, vision, organizations, and meaning

Great Groups are vivid Utopias. They are a picture of the way organizations ought to look -- sort of like a set of aspirations and a graphic illustration of what's possible. So how do we, in our mundane, quotidian organizations, create these things? I think there are a number of factors that we can look at.

Perhaps the key factor, and it's almost a banal thing to say, is finding a meaning in what you do. That is, how do you make people feel that what they're doing is somewhat equivalent to a search for the Holy Grail?

This is more than just having a vision. You can see the difference in the often-cited way in which Steve Jobs brought in John Sculley to take over Apple. At the time, Sculley was destined to be the head of Pepsico. The clincher came when Jobs asked him, "How many more years of your life do you want to spend making colored water when you can have an opportunity to come here and change the world?"

Warren Bennis

Source: An Interview with Warren Bennis: http://www.strategy-business.com/press/16635507/18276

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Warren Bennis on excellence, teacher, mediocrity, and lessons

Excellence is a better teacher than mediocrity. The lessons of the ordinary are everywhere. Truly profound and original insights are to be found only in studying the exemplary.

Warren Bennis

Source: My diary

Contributed by: jagadish

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