Voltaire

1694 - 1778

A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on death

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I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Source: Attributed in SG Tallentyre, The friends of Voltaire, 1907

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on life

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Monsieur l'abbé, I detest what you write, but I would give my life to make it possible for you to continue to write.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Source: Letter to M. Le Riche, February 6, 1770, in A Book of French Quotations, by Norbert Guterman

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A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on animals, envy, evil, and ignorance

I envy animals for two things - their ignorance of evil to come, and their ignorance of what is said about them.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

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A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on garden

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I also know that we should cultivate our gardens.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Source: Candide

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A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on audiences, comedy, god, and laughter

God is a comedian playing to an audience too afraid to laugh.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on god

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It is said that God is always on the side of the heaviest battalions. On dit que Dieu est toujours pour les gros bataillons

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Source: Letter to M. le Riche. 1770.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on life

in

To enjoy life we must touch much of it lightly.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire

The superfluous, a very necessary thing.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Source: Le Mondain

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A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on grief, language, silence, and tears

Tears are the silent language of grief.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on animals, death, funerals, and ideas

Animals have these advantages over man: They never hear the clock strike, they die without any idea of death, they have no theologians to instruct them, their last moments are not disturbed by unwelcome and unpleasant ceremonies, their funerals cost them nothing, and no one starts lawsuits over their wills.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Contributed by: Zaady

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