Tsunetomo Yamamoto

A Quote by Tsunetomo Yamamoto on emptiness, form, bushido, zen, and buddhism

Our bodies are given life from the midst of nothingness. Existing where there is nothing is the meaning of the phrase, "Form is emptiness." That all things are provided for by nothingness is the meaning of the phrase, "Emptiness is form." One should not think that these are two seperate things.

Tsunetomo Yamamoto

Source: The Hagakure

Contributed by: Laurens

A Quote by Tsunetomo Yamamoto on bushido, zen, reality, non-duality, one, spirituality, and spiritual warrior

It is bad when one thing becomes two. One should not look for anything else in the Way of the Samurai. If one understands things in this manner, he should be able to hear about all Ways and be more and more in accord with his own.

Tsunetomo Yamamoto

Source: The Hagakure

Contributed by: Laurens

A Quote by Tsunetomo Yamamoto on bushido, zen, reality, falling, being at ease, blind masseuses, the way, spirituality, spiritual warrior, and japan

Once a group of ten blind masseuses were travelling together in the mountains, and when they began to pass along the top of the precipice, they all became very cautious, their legs shook, and they were in general struck with terror. Just then the leading man stumbled and fell off the cliff. Those that were left all wailed, "Ahh, ahh! How piteous!" But the masseuse who had fallen yelled up from below, "Don't be afraid. Although I fell, it was nothing. I am now rather at ease. Before falling I kept thinking 'What will I do when I fall?' and there was no end to my anxiety. But now I've settled down. If the rest of you want to be at ease, fall quickly!"

Tsunetomo Yamamoto

Source: The Hagakure

Contributed by: Laurens

A Quote by Tsunetomo Yamamoto on bushido, zen, life, present moment, and spiritual warrior

There is surely nothing other than the single purpose of the present moment. A man's whole life is a succesion of moment after moment. If one fully understands the present moment, there will be nothing else to do, and nothing else to pursue. Live being true to the single purpose of the present moment.

Tsunetomo Yamamoto

Source: The Hagakure

Contributed by: Laurens

A Quote by Tsunetomo Yamamoto on bushido, zen, life, present moment, and spiritual warrior

Everyone lets the present moment slip by, then looks for it as though he thought it was somewhere else. No one seems to have noticed this fact. But grasping this firmly, one must pile experience upon experience. And once one has come to this understanding he will be a different person from that point on, though he may not always bare it in mind. When one understands this settling into single-mindedness well, his affairs will thin out.

Tsunetomo Yamamoto

Source: The Hagakure

Contributed by: Laurens

A Quote by Tsunetomo Yamamoto on bushido, zen, life, on-going practice, and spiritual warrior

It is not good to settle into a set of opinions. It is a mistake to put forth effort and obtain some understanding and then stop at that. At first putting forth great effort to be sure that you have grasped the basics, then practicing so that they may come to fruition is something that will never stop for your whole lifetime. Do not rely on following the degree of understanding that you have discovered, but simply think, "This is not enough."

Tsunetomo Yamamoto

Source: Hagakure

Contributed by: Laurens

A Quote by Tsunetomo Yamamoto on bushido, zen, life, rain, and spiritual warrior

There is something to be learned from a rainstorm. When meeting with a sudden shower, you try not to get wet and run quickly along the road. But doing such things as passing under the eaves of houses, you still get wet. When you are resolved from the beginning, you will not be perplexed, though you will still get the same soaking. This understanding extends to everyhting

Tsunetomo Yamamoto

Source: The Hagakure

Contributed by: Laurens

A Quote by Tsunetomo Yamamoto on bushido, zen, life, dragons, and spiritual warrior

In China there was once a man who liked pictures of dragons, and his clothing and furnishings were all designed accordingly. His deep affection for dragons was brought to the attention of the dragon god, and onde day a real dragon appeared before his window. It is said that he died of fright. He was probably a man who always spoke big words but acted differently when facing the real thing.

Tsunetomo Yamamoto

Source: The Hagakure

Contributed by: Laurens

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