T.S. Eliot

1888 - 1965

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on goodbye and time

Turning Wearily, as one would turn to nod goodbye to Rochefoucauld, If the street were time and he as the end of the street.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Source: The Boston Evening Transcript

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on information, knowledge, life, losing, and wisdom

Where is the Life we have lost in living? Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Source: The Rock

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on approval, attitude, authors, behavior, and certainty

When we read of human beings behaving in certain ways, with the approval of the author, who gives his benediction to this behavior by his attitude towards the result of the behavior arranged by himself, we can be influenced towards behaving in the same way.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on literature and religion

We know too much, and are convinced of too little. Our literature is a substitute for religion, and so is our religion.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on women

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When lovely woman stoops to folly and Paces about her room again, alone, She smooths her hair with automatic hand, And puts a record on the gramophone.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Source: The Waste Land, 1922, The Fire Sermon

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on people, trouble, and world

Most of the trouble in the world is caused by people wanting to be important.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on beginning, darkness, emptiness, and men

Old men ought to be explorers Here and there does not matter We must be still and still moving Into another intensity For further union, a deeper communion Through the dark cold and the empty desolation . . . In my end is my beginning.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on birth, bitterness, cities, darkness, dawn, death, doubt, emptiness, horses, information, journeys, justice, lies, men, people, regret, sleep, thought, time, travel, water, weather, wine, and women

Journey of the Magi "A cold coming we had of it, Just the worst time of the year For a journey, and such a long journey: The ways deep and the weather sharp, The very dead of winter." And the camels galled, sore-footed, refractory, Lying down in the melting snow. There were times we regretted The summer palaces on slopes, the terraces, And the silken girls bringing sherbet. Then the camel men cursing and grumbling And running away, and wanting their liquor and women, And the night-fires going out, and the lack of shelters, And the cities hostile and the towns unfriendly And the villages dirty and charging high prices: A hard time we had of it. At the end we preferred to travel all night, Sleeping in snatches, With the voices singing in our ears, saying That this was all folly. Then at dawn we came down to a temperate valley, Wet, below the snow line, smelling of vegetation, With a running stream and a water-mill beating the darkness, And three trees on the low sky. And an old white horse galloped away in the meadow. Then we came to a tavern with vine-leaves over the lintel, Six hands at an open door dicing for pieces of silver, And feet kicking the empty wine-skins. But there was no information, and so we continued And arrived at evening, not a moment too soon Finding the place; it was (you may say) satisfactory. All this was a long time ago, I remember, And I would do it again, but set down This set down This: were we led all that way for Birth or Death? There was a Birth, certainly, We had evidence and no doubt. I had seen birth and death, But had thought they were different; this Birth was Hard and bitter agony for us, like Death, our death. We returned to our places, these Kingdoms, But no longer at ease here, in the old dispensation, With an alien people clutching their gods. I should be glad of another death.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on garden, giving, grace, journeys, life, love, memory, motherhood, satisfaction, and speech

Lady of silences Calm and distressed Torn and most whole Rose of memory Rose of forgetfulness Exhausted and life-giving Worried reposeful The single Rose Is now the Garden Where all loves end Terminate torment Of love unsatisfied The greater torment Of love satisfied End of the endless Journey to no end Conclusion of all that Is inconclusible Speech without word and Word of no speech Grace to the Mother For the Garden Where all love ends.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Source: Ash Wednesday, 1930

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on laughter

He laughed like an irresponsible foetus.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Source: Mr. Apollinox, 1917

Contributed by: Zaady

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