Tryon Edwards

1809 - 1894

A Quote by Tryon Edwards on change, correction, and mistakes

He that never changes his opinions, never corrects his mistakes, will never be wiser on the morrow than he is today.

Tryon Edwards (1809 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Tryon Edwards on common sense, discretion, good, judgment, life, practicality, and wisdom

Common sense is, of all kinds, the most uncommon. It implies good judgment, sound discretion, and true and practical wisdom applied to common life.

Tryon Edwards (1809 - 1894)

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Tryon Edwards on accuracy, falsehood, and truth

Accuracy of statement is one of the first elements of truth; inaccuracy is a near kin to falsehood.

Tryon Edwards (1809 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Tryon Edwards on anger, day, and sorrow

He who can suppress a moment's anger may prevent a day of sorrow.

Tryon Edwards (1809 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Tryon Edwards on anger

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To rule one's anger is well; to prevent it is still better.

Tryon Edwards (1809 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Tryon Edwards on anxiety, life, power, providence, remedies, and trust

Anxiety is the rust of life, destroying its brightness and weakening its power. A childlike and abiding trust in Providence is its best preventive and remedy.

Tryon Edwards (1809 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Tryon Edwards on guidance, past, present, and wisdom

Apothegms are the wisdom of the past condensed for the instruction and guidance of the present.

Tryon Edwards (1809 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Tryon Edwards on delay, duty, foolishness, safety, and wisdom

Where duty is plain, delay is both foolish and hazardous; where it is not, delay may be both wisdom and safety.

Tryon Edwards (1809 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Tryon Edwards on discipline, education, and mind

The great end of education is to discipline rather than to furnish the mind; to train it to the use of its own powers, rather than fill it with the accumulation of others.

Tryon Edwards (1809 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Tryon Edwards on ignorance and mystery

Mystery is another name for our ignorance; if we were omniscient, all would be perfectly plain.

Tryon Edwards (1809 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

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