Thomas Jefferson

1743 - 1826

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on posterity

Planting is one of my great amusements, and even of those things which can only be for posterity, for a Septuagenary has no right to count on any thing but annuals.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on god, justice, and reflection

I tremble for my species when I reflect that God is just.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on country, god, justice, and reflection

Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Source: Notes on Virginia, Query xviii. Manners

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on god, liberty, life, and time

The God who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Source: Summary View of the Rights of British America.

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on ambition, men, and pain

I have no ambition to govern men. It is a painful and thankless office.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on people

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He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither swarms of officers to harass our people and eat out their substance.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Source: Declaration of Independence, 1776

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on duty, fear, good, government, men, and principles

No government can be maintained without the principle of fear as well as of duty. Good men will obey the last, but bad ones the former only.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on government

That government is the strongest of which every man feels himself a part.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on government

Those who bear equally the burdens of government should equally participate in the benefits.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

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A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on change, errors, reason, safety, and wishes

If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve this Union or to change its republican form, let them stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with which error of opinion may be tolerated where reason is left free to combat it.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Source: first Inaugural, 4 March 1801

Contributed by: Zaady

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