Thomas Huxley

1825 - 1895

A Quote by Thomas Henry Huxley on mistake, conclusion, opinions, worthless, and badly argued

There is no greater mistake than the hasty conclusion that opinions are worthless because they are badly argued.

Thomas Huxley (1825 - 1895)

Contributed by: PiALOGUE

A Quote by Thomas H. Huxley

Every great advance in natural knowledge has involved the absolute rejection of authority.

Thomas Huxley (1825 - 1895)

Contributed by: The Grand Abbot

A Quote by Thomas Henry Huxley on heart and morality

Veracity is the heart of morality.

Thomas Huxley (1825 - 1895)

Source: Universities, Actual & Ideal

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Henry Huxley on crime, mankind, medicine, suffering, and wisdom

The only medicine for suffering, crime, and all the other woes of mankind, is wisdom.

Thomas Huxley (1825 - 1895)

Source: Science and Education, 1868.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Henry Huxley on reason and wisdom

Let us have "sweet girl graduates" by all means. They will be none the less sweet for a little wisdom; and the "golden hair" will not curl less gracefully outside the head by reason of there being brains within.

Thomas Huxley (1825 - 1895)

Source: Emancipation—Black and White, 1865

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Henry Huxley

It is not who is right, but what is right, that is important.

Thomas Huxley (1825 - 1895)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Henry Huxley on cleverness, patience, purpose, tenacity, and worth

Patience and tenacity of purpose are worth more than twice their weight in cleverness.

Thomas Huxley (1825 - 1895)

Source: "On Medical Education," address, 1870, University College, London, in Collected Essays, vol.3, 1893

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Henry Huxley on authority and knowledge

Every great advance in natural knowledge has involved the absolute rejection of authority.

Thomas Huxley (1825 - 1895)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Henry Huxley on rest

in

The rung of a ladder was never meant to rest upon, but only to hold a man's foot long enough to enable him to put the other somewhat higher.

Thomas Huxley (1825 - 1895)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Henry Huxley on common sense, organize, and science

Science is nothing but trained and organized common sense, differing from the latter only as a veteran may differ from a raw recruit: and its methods differ from those of common sense only as far as the guardsman's cut and thrust differ from the manner in which a savage wields his club.

Thomas Huxley (1825 - 1895)

Source: Collected Essays

Contributed by: Zaady

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