Thomas Hardy

1840 - 1928

A Quote by Thomas Hardy on fashion

in

But-a stirring thrills the air Like to sounds of joyance there That the rages Of the ages Shall be cancelled, and deliverance offered from the darts that were, Consciousness the Will informing, till it fashion all things fair!

Thomas Hardy (1840 - 1928)

Source: The Dynasts

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Hardy

And the spirits of those who were homing Passed on, rushingly, Like the Pentecost Wind.

Thomas Hardy (1840 - 1928)

Source: Souls of the Slain

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Hardy

Ah! stirring times we live in-stirring times.

Thomas Hardy (1840 - 1928)

Source: Far From the Madding Crowd

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Hardy on tears

in

That long drip of human tears.

Thomas Hardy (1840 - 1928)

Source: On an Invitation to the United States

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Hardy on death and victory

The courses of theVictory were absorbed into the main, then her topsails went, and then her top-gallants. She was now no more than a dead fly's wing on a sheet of spider's web; and even this fragment diminished. Anne could hardly bear to see the end, and yet she resolved not to flinch. The admiral's flag sank behind the watery line, and in a minute the very trunk of the last main-mast stole away. The Victory was gone.

Thomas Hardy (1840 - 1928)

Source: The Trumpet Major

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Hardy on argument, good, history, peace, reading, and war

My argument is that War makes rattling good history; but Peace is poor reading.

Thomas Hardy (1840 - 1928)

Source: The Dynasts

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Hardy

The all-urging Will, raptly magnipotent.

Thomas Hardy (1840 - 1928)

Source: The Dynasts

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Hardy

If way to the Better there be, it exacts a full look at the worst.

Thomas Hardy (1840 - 1928)

Source: Tenebris

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Hardy on christmas, doubt, elderly, gloom, hope, and loneliness

Christmas Eve, and twelve of the clock. "Now they are all on their knees," An elder said as we sat in a flock By the embers in hearth-side ease. We pictured the meek mild creatures where They dwelt in their strawy pen, Nor did it occur to one of us there To doubt they were kneeling then. So fair a fancy few would weave In these years! yet, I feel If someone said on Christmas Eve, "Come; see the oxen kneel, In the lonely barton by yonder coomb Our childhood used to know," I should go with him in the gloom, Hoping it might be so.

Thomas Hardy (1840 - 1928)

Source: “Christmas Eve”

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Hardy

Always washing, and never getting finished.

Thomas Hardy (1840 - 1928)

Source: Tess of the D’Urbervilles

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content