Thomas Gray

1716 - 1771

A Quote by Thomas Gray

To high-born Hoel's harp, or soft Llewellyn's lay.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: The Bard. I. 2, Line 14.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on bliss, happiness, and pain

Ah, happy hills! ah, pleasing shade! Ah, fields beloved in vain! Where once my careless childhood stray'd, A stranger yet to pain! I feel the gales that from ye blow A momentary bliss bestow.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: On a Distant Prospect of Eton College. Stanza 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on death

in

And many a holy text around she strews, That teach the rustic moralist to die.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 21.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray

And waste their sweetness on the desert air.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy, stanza 14. Charles Churchill: Gotham, book ii. line 20.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on country, rest, and tyranny

Some village Hampden, that with dauntless breast The little tyrant of his fields withstood, Some mute inglorious Milton here may rest, Some Cromwell guiltless of his country's blood.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 15.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on history, nations, and pain

The applause of list'ning senates to command, The threats of pain and ruin to despise, To scatter plenty o'er a smiling land, And read their history in a nation's eyes.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 16.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on beauty, boasts, glory, wealth, and path

The boast of heraldry, the pomp of pow'r, And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave, Await alike the inevitable hour. The paths of glory lead but to the grave.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 9.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray

The breezy call of incense-breathing morn.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 5.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on darkness, day, and world

The curfew tolls the knell of parting day, The lowing herd winds slowly o'er the lea, The ploughman homeward plods his weary way, And leaves the world to darkness and to me.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on fate, good, limits, and vulgarity

Beyond the limits of a vulgar fate, Beneath the good how far,-but far above the great.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: The Progress of Poesy. III. Line 16.

Contributed by: Zaady

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