Thomas Gray

1716 - 1771

A Quote by Thomas Gray on death, honor, and silence

Can storied urn, or animated bust, Back to its mansion call the fleeting breath? Can honour's voice provoke the silent dust, Or flatt'ry soothe the dull cold ear of death?

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 11.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on home

in

And hie him home, at evening's close, To sweet repast and calm repose.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Ode on the Pleasure Arising from Vicissitude. Line 87.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on bliss

in

The hues of bliss more brightly glow, Chastised by sabler tints of woe.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Ode on the Pleasure arising from Vicissitude. Line 45.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on custom

in

One morn I miss'd him on the custom'd hill, Along the heath, and near his fav'rite tree: Another came; nor yet beside the rill, Nor up the lawn, nor at the wood was he.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 28.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on confusion, conquest, and idleness

Ruin seize thee, ruthless king! Confusion on thy banners wait! Though fann'd by Conquest's crimson wing, They mock the air with idle state.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: The Bard. I. 1, Line 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on dawn and love

in

When love could teach a monarch to be wise, And gospel-light first dawn'd from Bullen's eyes.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on fortune

in

Too poor for a bribe, and too proud to importune, He had not the method of making a fortune.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Sketch of His Own Character

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on birth, earth, fame, fortune, humility, melancholy, science, and youth

Here rests his head upon the lap of earth, A youth to fortune and to fame unknown: Fair Science frown'd not on his humble birth, And Melancholy mark'd him for her own.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: The Epitaph.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray

The breezy call of incense-breathing morn.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 5.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on darkness, day, and world

The curfew tolls the knell of parting day, The lowing herd winds slowly o'er the lea, The ploughman homeward plods his weary way, And leaves the world to darkness and to me.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content