Thomas Gray

1716 - 1771

A Quote by Thomas Gray on laughter and madness

And moody madness laughing wild Amid severest woe.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: On a Distant Prospect of Eton College. Stanza 8.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on paradise

The meanest floweret of the vale, The simplest note that swells the gale, The common sun, the air, the skies, To him are opening paradise.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Ode on the Pleasure arising from Vicissitude. Line 53.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on knowledge, nobility, soul, and time

But Knowledge to their eyes her ample page, Rich with the spoils of time, did ne'er unroll; Chill penury repress'd their noble rage, And froze the genial current of the soul.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 13.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on simplicity

Nor grandeur hear with a disdainful smile The short and simple annals of the poor.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 8.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray

Rich windows that exclude the light, And passages that lead to nothing.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: A Long Story.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on death, honor, and silence

Can storied urn, or animated bust, Back to its mansion call the fleeting breath? Can honour's voice provoke the silent dust, Or flatt'ry soothe the dull cold ear of death?

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 11.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on home

in

And hie him home, at evening's close, To sweet repast and calm repose.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Ode on the Pleasure Arising from Vicissitude. Line 87.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on bliss

in

The hues of bliss more brightly glow, Chastised by sabler tints of woe.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Ode on the Pleasure arising from Vicissitude. Line 45.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray

And waste their sweetness on the desert air.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy, stanza 14. Charles Churchill: Gotham, book ii. line 20.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on country, rest, and tyranny

Some village Hampden, that with dauntless breast The little tyrant of his fields withstood, Some mute inglorious Milton here may rest, Some Cromwell guiltless of his country's blood.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 15.

Contributed by: Zaady

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