Thomas Gray

1716 - 1771

A Quote by Thomas Gray

Implores the passing tribute of a sigh.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 20.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray

Iron sleet of arrowy shower Hurtles in the darken'd air.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: The Fatal Sisters. Line 3.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray

Iron sleet of arrowy shower Hurtles in the darken'd air.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: The Fatal Sisters. Line 3.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on friendship, heaven, sincerity, soul, and wishes

Large was his bounty, and his soul sincere, Heaven did a recompense as largely send: He gave to mis'ry (all he had) a tear, He gained from Heav'n ('t was all he wish'd) a friend.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: The Epitaph.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray

Loose his beard, and hoary hair Stream'd like a meteor to the troubled air.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: The Bard. I. 2, Line 5.

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A Quote by Thomas Gray on mankind and mercy

Forbade to wade through slaughter to a throne, And shut the gates of mercy on mankind.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 17.

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A Quote by Thomas Gray on progress

From Helicon's harmonious springs A thousand rills their mazy progress take.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: The Progress of Poesy. I. 1, Line 3.

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A Quote by Thomas Gray on day, health, heaven, peace, and wealth

From toil he wins his spirits light, From busy day the peaceful night; Rich, from the very want of wealth, In heaven's best treasures, peace and health.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Ode on the Pleasure arising from Vicissitude. Line 93.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on blush

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Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, And waste its sweetness on the desert air.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on bliss, destruction, fate, happiness, ignorance, men, pain, paradise, sorrow, and thought

To each his suff'rings; all are men, Condemn'd alike to groan,- The tender for another's pain, Th' unfeeling for his own. Yet ah! why should they know their fate, Since sorrow never comes too late, And happiness too swiftly flies? Thought would destroy their paradise. No more; where ignorance is bliss, 'T is folly to be wise.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: On a Distant Prospect of Eton College. Stanza 10.

Contributed by: Zaady

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