Thomas Carlyle

1795 - 1881

A Quote by Thomas Carlyle on life, men, suffering, and tragedy

The tragedy of life is not so much what men suffer, but rather what they miss.

Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)

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A Quote by Thomas Carlyle

The fearful unbelief is unbelief in yourself.

Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)

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A Quote by Thomas Carlyle on books

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The true university of these days is a collection of books.

Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)

Source: The Hero as a Man of Letters.

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A Quote by Thomas Carlyle on kindness, problems, universe, women, and work

It is the first of all problems for a man (or woman) to find out what kind of work he (or she) is to do in this universe.

Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)

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A Quote by Thomas Carlyle on work

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Blessed is he who has found his work; let him ask no other blessedness.

Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)

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A Quote by Thomas Carlyle on composers, harmony, kindness, labor, soul, and work

Even in the meanest sorts of Labor, the whole soul of a man is composed into a kind of real harmony the instant he sets himself to work.

Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)

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A Quote by Thomas Carlyle on religion and work

Properly speaking, all true work is religion.

Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)

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A Quote by Thomas Carlyle on earth, heaven, labor, sacred, and work

All true work is sacred. In all true work, were it but true hand work, there is something of divineness. Labor, wide as the earth, has its summit in Heaven.

Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)

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A Quote by Thomas Carlyle on work

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All work is as seed sown; it grows and spreads, and sows itself anew.

Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)

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A Quote by Thomas Carlyle on biography, death, existence, future, heaven, life, nations, past, sacred, suffering, present, and universe

All life is figured by them as a Tree. Igdrasil, the Ash-tree of existence, has its roots deep-down in the kingdoms of Death: its trunk reaches up heaven-high, spreads its boughs over the whole Universe: it is the Tree of Existence. At the foot of it, in the Death-Kingdom, sit the three Fates - the Past, Present and Future; watering its roots from the Sacred Well. It's "bough," with their buddings and disleafings, - events, things suffered, things done, catastrophes, - stretch through all lands and times. Is not every leaf of it a biography, every fiber there an act or word? Its boughs are the Histories of Nations. The rustle of it is the noise of Human Existence, onwards from of old. . . . I find no similitude so true as this of a Tree. Beautiful; altogether beautiful and great.

Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)

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