Sylvia Townsend Warner

1893 - 1978

A Quote by Sylvia Townsend Warner on accuracy, books, dawn, joy, justice, kindness, libraries, mathematics, mind, novelty, and passion

For twenty pages perhaps, he read slowly, carefully, dutifully, with pauses for self-examination and working out examples. Then, just as it was working up and the pauses should have been more scrupulous than ever, a kind of swoon and ecstasy would fall on him, and he read ravening on, sitting up till dawn to finish the book, as though it were a novel. After that his passion was stayed; the book went back to the Library and he was done with mathematics till the next bout. Not much remained with him after these orgies, but something remained: a sensation in the mind, a worshiping acknowledgment of something isolated and unassailable, or a remembered mental joy at the rightness of thoughts coming together to a conclusion, accurate thoughts, thoughts in just intonation, coming together like unaccompanied voices coming to a close.

Sylvia Townsend Warner (1893 - 1978)

Source: Mr. Fortune's Maggot.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sylvia Townsend Warner on anecdotes, fortune, leadership, mathematics, and theology

Theology, Mr. Fortune found, is a more accommodating subject than mathematics; its technique of exposition allows greater latitude. For instance when you are gravelled for matter there is always the moral to fall back upon. Comparisons too may be drawn, leading cases cited, types and antetypes analysed and anecdotes introduced. Except for Archimedes mathematics is singularly naked of anecdotes.

Sylvia Townsend Warner (1893 - 1978)

Source: Mr. Fortune's Maggot.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sylvia Townsend Warner on order and security

He resumed: "In order to ascertain the height of the tree I must be in such a position that the top of the tree is exactly in a line with the top of a measuring stick or any straight object would do, such as an umbrella which I shall secure in an upright position between my feet. Knowing then that the ratio that the height of the tree bears to the length of the measuring stick must equal the ratio that the distance from my eye to the base of the tree bears to my height, and knowing (or being able to find out) my height, the length of the measuring stick and the distance from my eye to the base of the tree, I can, therefore, calculate the height of the tree." "What is an umbrella?"

Sylvia Townsend Warner (1893 - 1978)

Source: Mr. Fortune's Maggot.

Contributed by: Zaady

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