Sydney Smith

1771 - 1845

A Quote by Sydney Smith on good and nature

Politeness is good nature regulated by good sense.

Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sydney Smith on death

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He deserves to be preached to death by wild curates.

Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sydney Smith on faith and reason

It is always right that a man should be able to render a reason for the faith that is within him.

Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845)

Source: Lady Holland's Memoir. Vol. i. P. 53.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sydney Smith on day, happiness, and resolution

When you rise in the morning, form a resolution to make the day a happy one to a fellow creature.

Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sydney Smith on people

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You find people ready enough to do the Samaritan, without the oil and twopence.

Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845)

Source: Lady Holland's Memoir. Vol. i. P. 261.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sydney Smith on conversation and silence

He had occasional flashes of silence that made his conversation perfectly delightful.

Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sydney Smith on death, horses, medicine, privilege, and youth

The schoolboy whips his taxed top; the beardless youth manages his taxed horse with a taxed bridle on a taxed road; and the dying Englishman, pouring his medicine, which has paid seven per cent, into a spoon that has paid fifteen per cent, flings himself back upon his chintz bed which has paid twenty-two per cent, and expires in the arms of an apothecary who has paid a license of a hundred pounds for the privilege of putting him to death.

Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845)

Source: Review of Seybert's Annals of the United States, 1820.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sydney Smith on jokes and understanding

It requires a surgical operation to get a joke well into a Scotch understanding.

Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845)

Source: Lady Holland's Memoir. Vol. i. p. 15.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sydney Smith on danger, thinking, world, and worth

To do anything in this world worth doing, we must not stand back shivering and thinking of the cold and danger, but jump in, and scramble through as well as we can.

Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sydney Smith

That knuckle-end of England,-that land of Calvin, oat-cakes, and sulphur.

Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845)

Source: Lady Holland's Memoir. Vol. i. P. 17.

Contributed by: Zaady

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