Susan Hill

A Quote by Susan Hill on accidents, achievement, awareness, design, garden, hope, nature, perfection, and planning

The more contemplative gardener, seeing the garden as a whole, the design of it, and its nature as a still place of delight and refreshment, will wait and hope for the moment when it seems to achieve perfection. Awareness of when such moments are most likely helps to make them happen; they will not be entirely accidental but anticipated; everything will be planned to encourage them.

Susan Hill

Source: Reflections from a Garden, 1995

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Susan Hill on influence, seasons, and time

Gardeners celebrate the influence of time. If we have had a late cold spring followed by a desiccating drought, autumn may be the most soft and golden for years; one poor season will sooner or later be compensated for by another.

Susan Hill

Source: Reflections from a Garden, 1995

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Susan Hill on accidents, garden, happiness, and plants

Perfect moments come in every garden, though more frequently in some than others. To the very active gardener they may not be of great importance and usually they will be happy accidents, lucky moments when, chancing to glance up, the gardener will see that this or that grouping of plants at the height of their flowering looks exactly right, because of the way the light falls on them.

Susan Hill

Source: Reflections from a Garden, 1995

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Susan Hill on change, perfection, quality, and seasons

This gardener will be out in the very early morning and from late afternoon, attentive to small changes in the quality of light and the atmosphere, as well as to every nuance of the season, which combine to create perfection.

Susan Hill

Source: Reflections from a Garden, 1995

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Susan Hill on death, garden, life, order, and time

There is a continuity about the garden and an order of succession in the garden year which is deeply pleasing, and in one sense there are no breaks or divisions - seed time flows on to flowering time and harvest time; no sooner is one thing dying than another is coming to life.

Susan Hill

Source: Reflections from a Garden, 1995

Contributed by: Zaady

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