Stewart Dalzell

A Quote by Judge Stewart Dalzell on internet and speech

The Internet is a far more speech-enhancing medium than print, the village green, or the mails. Because it would necessarily affect the Internet itself, the [Communications Decency Act] would necessarily reduce the speech available for adults on the medium. This is a constitutionally intolerable result.

Stewart Dalzell

Source: 1996, ACLU, et al., v. Janet Reno, 96-963 and ALA, et al., v. Dept. of Justice, 96-1458

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Judge Stewart Dalzell on absence, achievement, chaos, contentment, internet, justice, kindness, liberty, speech, strength, and success

True it is that many find some of the speech on the Internet to be offensive, and amid the din of cyberspace many hear discordant voices that they regard as indecent. The absence of governmental regulation of Internet content has unquestionably produced a kind of chaos, but as one of plaintiffs' experts put it with such resonance at the hearing: "What achieved success was the very chaos that the Internet is. The strength of the Internet is that chaos." Just as the strength of the Internet is chaos, so the strength of our liberty depends upon the chaos and cacophony of the unfettered speech the First Amendment protects. For these reasons, I without hesitation hold that the [Communications Decency Act] is unconstitutional on its face.

Stewart Dalzell

Source: 1996, ACLU, et al., v. Janet Reno, 96-963 and ALA, et al., v. Dept. of Justice, 96-1458

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Judge Stewart Dalzell on argument, conversation, government, internet, principles, and speech

The Internet may fairly be regarded as a never-ending worldwide conversation. The government may not, through the [Communications Decency Act], interrupt that conversation. . . . As the most participatory form of mass speech yet developed, the Internet deserves the highest protection from governmental intrusion. . . . The government, therefore, implicitly asks this court to limit both the amount of speech on the Internet and the availability of that speech. This argument is profoundly repugnant to First Amendment principles.

Stewart Dalzell

Source: 1996, ACLU, et al., v Janet Reno, 96-963 and ALA, et al., v Dept of Justice, 96-1458

Contributed by: Zaady

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