Sterling W. Sill

1903 - 1994

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on beginning, day, and life

Life begins when we begin and each day we ought to be born again.

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on god, harmony, life, love, and men

That man loves God who puts his own life in harmony with him, and who serves his fellow men as though his life depends upon it, as indeed it does.

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on bitterness, joy, justice, time, and value

Make sure that your ambitions are really lofty - not just seem to be. Sometimes instead of engaging in those so called "mountaintop employments of great value," we spend our time in digging a pit and then falling therein, so that our temporary joy may become a permanent and bitter loss.

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on ambition, attitude, enthusiasm, failure, good, laziness, and loyalty

Everything depends on attitude. We are ambitious or lazy, enthusiastic or dull, loyal or undependable, according to our attitude. We get good grades or poor grades - according to our attitudes. Discouragement is an attitude. Lack of industry is an attitude. Failure to follow instructions is an attitude. attitude

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on doubt and faith

We can cross the rivers of doubt and discouragement on the bridge of faith even before we get to them.

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on home, judgment, life, and time

You can't judge a man by watching him live. . . . I personally watched Babe Ruth at bat three times, and he struck out every time. But at the very time that I was watching him strike out, the record said that he was the greatest home-run king who ever lived.

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on argument, blindness, fighting, and ideas

Fighting is not the best way to win an argument. If carried to its ultimate conclusions, the old idea of "an eye for an eye" eventually ends in making everybody blind.

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Source: Speech at BYU, November 9 1965

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on accuracy, baseball, books, day, difficulty, enthusiasm, errors, god, individuality, life, losing, motivation, people, separation, statistics, and success

In baseball we keep an accurate record of the hits, runs, and errors of each individual player. Life is also a great game, and in life the statistics are much more important than they are in a ball game. One of our human weaknesses in life is that when we are losing the game, we don't always like to keep track of the score. Certainly we are not very enthusiastic about putting the errors down on the paper, and most people don't even know what their individual batting average is. This makes our success much more difficult both to figure out and to attain . . . we cannot separate our success from our statistics. If each day we could see what God writes in his book about our works for that day, it would certainly motivate us to make better scores.

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Source: Told by Sterling W. Sill in Majesty of Books, p. 34

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on confidence, difficulty, education, god, good, intelligence, life, people, responsibility, selfishness, soul, and world

Certainly the greatest values in the world are human values, and the most worthwhile ambitions in people have to do with building human beings. The most important responsibility that God has ever laid upon the shoulders of any human being is that of making the best and the most of his own life. I heard of somebody once who said he was interested in doing the greatest amount of good for the greatest number, and that the greatest number was number one. That was himself. That may sound like a little bit of selfishness, but if that is selfishness, at least it is a very intelligent selfishness. Everyone has a right to be interested in himself, and I am confident that God wants us to be interested in ourselves first; that is, the first soul that anyone should bring to God should be his own soul. We cannot do very much for anyone else until we have first done something for ourselves. That is, it is pretty difficult to give someone else an education unless we have some education ourselves. It is pretty hard to get someone else to think unless we ourselves are thinkers.

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Source: Speech at BYU, November 9 1965

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sterling W. Sill on bankers, behavior, friendship, learning, reason, struggle, time, water, and wisdom

A young man came to Socrates one time and said, "Mr. Socrates, I have come 1,600 miles to talk to you about wisdom and learning." He said, "You are a man of wisdom and learning, and I would like to be a man of wisdom and learning." Socrates said, "Come follow me," and he led the way down to the seashore. They waded out into the water up to their waists, and then Socrates turned on his friend and held his head under the water. His friend struggled and kicked and bucked and tried to get away, but Socrates held him down. Now if you hold someone's head under the water long enough, he will eventually become fairly peaceable. And after this man had stopped struggling, Socrates laid him out on the bank to dry, and he went back to the market place. After the young man had dried out a little bit, he came back to Socrates to find the reason for this rather unusual behavior. Socrates said to him, "When your head was under the water, what was the one thing you wanted more than anything else?" And the man said, "More than anything else, I wanted air." Socrates said, "All right, when you want wisdom and learning like you wanted air, you won't have to ask anybody to give it to you."

Sterling W. Sill (1903 - 1994)

Source: February 9, 1965, at BYU

Contributed by: Zaady

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