Soren Kierkegaard

1813 - 1855

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on freedom, men, speech, and thought

How absurd men are! They never use the liberties they have, they demand those they do not have. They have freedom of thought, they demand freedom of speech.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on desires and genius

Genius never desires what does not exist.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on genius and people

Geniuses are like thunderstorms. They go against the wind, terrify people, cleanse the air.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on discrimination, facts, god, and understanding

The absurd . . . the fact that with God all things are possible. The absurd is not one of the factors which can be discriminated within the proper compass of the understanding: it is not identical with the improbable, the unexpected, the unforeseen.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on anxiety, judgment, and readiness

No grand inquisitor has in readiness such terrible tortures as has anxiety and no spy knows how to attack more artfully the man he suspects, choosing the instant when he is weakest; nor knows how to lay traps where he will be caught and ensnared as anxiety knows how, and no sharp-witted judge knows how to interrogate, to examine the accused, as anxiety does, which never lets him escape...

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on freedom, people, speech, and thought

People hardly ever make use of the freedom they have, for example, freedom of thought; instead they demand freedom of speech as a compensation.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on christianity and guilt

The essentially Christian is certainly the highest and the supremely highest, but, mark well, in such a way that to the natural man it is an offense. Anyone who, in defining the essentially Christian as the highest, omits the middle term of offense sins against it, is guilty of presumptuousness. . . . The way to the essentially Christian goes through offense. This does not mean that the approach to the essentially Christian should be to be offended by it-this would indeed be another way of preventing oneself from grasping the essentially Christian-but the offense guards the approach to the essentially Christian. Blessed is he who is not offended at it.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: WORKS OF LOVE 1847

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on despair and individuality

An individual in despair despairs over something. . . . In despairing over something, he really despair[s] over himself, and now he wants to get rid of himself. Consequently, to despair over something is still not despair proper. . . . To despair over oneself, in despair to will to be rid of oneself-this is the formula for all despair.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on danger, death, despair, hope, and life

So to be sick unto death is, not to be able to die-yet not as though there were hope of life; no, the hopelessness in this case is that even the last hope, death, is not available. When death is the greatest danger, one hopes for life; but when one becomes acquainted with an even more dreadful danger, one hopes for death. So when the danger is so great that death has become one's hope, despair is the disconsolateness of not being able to die.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on despair, devil, and spirit

The ever increasing intensity of despair depends upon the degree of consciousness or is proportionate to this increase: the greater the degree of consciousness, the more intensive the despair. This is everywhere apparent, most clearly in despair at its maximum and minimum. The devil's despair is the most intensive despair, for the devil is sheer spirit and hence unqualified consciousness and transparency; there is no obscurity in the devil that could serve as a mitigating excuse. Therefore, his despair is the most absolute defiance. . . .

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

Contributed by: Zaady

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