Soren Kierkegaard

1813 - 1855

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on depression, faith, love, and wonder

In addition to my other numerous acquaintances, I have one more intimate confidant . . . . My depression is the most faithful mistress I have known - no wonder, then, that I return the love.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on chess

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I feel as if I were a piece in a game of chess, when my opponent says of it: That piece cannot be moved.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on danger, life, and risk

During the first period of a man's life the greatest danger is not to take the risk. When once the risk has really been taken, then the greatest danger is to risk too much.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on danger, death, despair, hope, and life

So to be sick unto death is, not to be able to die-yet not as though there were hope of life; no, the hopelessness in this case is that even the last hope, death, is not available. When death is the greatest danger, one hopes for life; but when one becomes acquainted with an even more dreadful danger, one hopes for death. So when the danger is so great that death has become one's hope, despair is the disconsolateness of not being able to die.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on despair, devil, and spirit

The ever increasing intensity of despair depends upon the degree of consciousness or is proportionate to this increase: the greater the degree of consciousness, the more intensive the despair. This is everywhere apparent, most clearly in despair at its maximum and minimum. The devil's despair is the most intensive despair, for the devil is sheer spirit and hence unqualified consciousness and transparency; there is no obscurity in the devil that could serve as a mitigating excuse. Therefore, his despair is the most absolute defiance. . . .

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on danger, despair, facts, ignorance, individuality, spirit, and truth

Compared with the person who is conscious of his despair, the despairing individual who is ignorant of his despair is simply a negativity further away from the truth and deliverance. . . . Yet ignorance is so far from breaking the despair or changing despair to nondespairing that it can in fact be the most dangerous form of despair. . . . An individual is furthest from being conscious of himself as spirit when he is ignorant of being in despair. But precisely this-not to be conscious of oneself as spirit-is despair, which is spiritlessness. . . .

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on despair, god, lawyers, and weakness

Sin is: before God, or with the conception of God, in despair not to will to be oneself, or in despair to will to be oneself. Thus sin is intensified weakness or intensified defiance: sin is the intensification of despair. The emphasis is on before God, or with a conception of God; it is the conception of God that makes sin dialectically, ethically, and religiously what lawyers call 'aggravated' despair.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on courage and religion

It takes moral courage to grieve; it requires religious courage to rejoice.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE JOURNALS

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on truth

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The truth is a snare: you cannot have it, without being caught. You cannot have the truth in such a way that you catch it, but only in such a way that it catches you.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on conflict, desires, good, majorities, truth, and world

The truth must essentially be regarded as in conflict with this world; the world has never been so good, and will never become so good that the majority will desire the truth.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

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