Soren Kierkegaard

1813 - 1855

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on eternity and god

God does not think; he creates. He does not exist; he is eternal.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on endurance, friendship, impatience, and jobs

Job endured everything - until his friends came to comfort him, then he grew impatient.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

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A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on depression, faith, love, and wonder

In addition to my other numerous acquaintances, I have one more intimate confidant . . . . My depression is the most faithful mistress I have known - no wonder, then, that I return the love.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on christianity and guilt

The essentially Christian is certainly the highest and the supremely highest, but, mark well, in such a way that to the natural man it is an offense. Anyone who, in defining the essentially Christian as the highest, omits the middle term of offense sins against it, is guilty of presumptuousness. . . . The way to the essentially Christian goes through offense. This does not mean that the approach to the essentially Christian should be to be offended by it-this would indeed be another way of preventing oneself from grasping the essentially Christian-but the offense guards the approach to the essentially Christian. Blessed is he who is not offended at it.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: WORKS OF LOVE 1847

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A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on despair and individuality

An individual in despair despairs over something. . . . In despairing over something, he really despair[s] over himself, and now he wants to get rid of himself. Consequently, to despair over something is still not despair proper. . . . To despair over oneself, in despair to will to be rid of oneself-this is the formula for all despair.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

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A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on danger, death, despair, hope, and life

So to be sick unto death is, not to be able to die-yet not as though there were hope of life; no, the hopelessness in this case is that even the last hope, death, is not available. When death is the greatest danger, one hopes for life; but when one becomes acquainted with an even more dreadful danger, one hopes for death. So when the danger is so great that death has become one's hope, despair is the disconsolateness of not being able to die.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on despair, devil, and spirit

The ever increasing intensity of despair depends upon the degree of consciousness or is proportionate to this increase: the greater the degree of consciousness, the more intensive the despair. This is everywhere apparent, most clearly in despair at its maximum and minimum. The devil's despair is the most intensive despair, for the devil is sheer spirit and hence unqualified consciousness and transparency; there is no obscurity in the devil that could serve as a mitigating excuse. Therefore, his despair is the most absolute defiance. . . .

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on danger, despair, facts, ignorance, individuality, spirit, and truth

Compared with the person who is conscious of his despair, the despairing individual who is ignorant of his despair is simply a negativity further away from the truth and deliverance. . . . Yet ignorance is so far from breaking the despair or changing despair to nondespairing that it can in fact be the most dangerous form of despair. . . . An individual is furthest from being conscious of himself as spirit when he is ignorant of being in despair. But precisely this-not to be conscious of oneself as spirit-is despair, which is spiritlessness. . . .

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on despair, god, lawyers, and weakness

Sin is: before God, or with the conception of God, in despair not to will to be oneself, or in despair to will to be oneself. Thus sin is intensified weakness or intensified defiance: sin is the intensification of despair. The emphasis is on before God, or with a conception of God; it is the conception of God that makes sin dialectically, ethically, and religiously what lawyers call 'aggravated' despair.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE SICKNESS UNTO DEATH 1849

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on courage and religion

It takes moral courage to grieve; it requires religious courage to rejoice.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE JOURNALS

Contributed by: Zaady

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