Sir Walter Scott

1771 - 1832

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on proverbs and words

There is a southern proverb - fine words butter no parsnips.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: The Legend of Montrose, 1819

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on flattery, losing, poets, and simplicity

Ne'er Was flattery lost on poet's ear; A simple race! they waste their toil For the vain tribute of a smile.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Lay of the Last Minstrel, 1805, canto iv, conclusion

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott

A foot more light, a step more true, Ne'er from the heath-flower dash'd the dew.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Lady of the Lake. 1810, Canto i. Stanza 18.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on art and friendship

Art thou a friend to Roderick?

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Lady of the Lake. 1810, Canto iv. Stanza 30.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on art, children, and garden

Nothing is more completely the child of art than a garden.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on grace

in

Oh, Brignall banks are wild and fair, And Greta woods are green, And you may gather garlands there Would grace a summer's queen.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Rokeby. Canto iii. Stanza 16.

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A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on god and strength

Profan'd the God-given strength, and marr'd the lofty line.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Marmion. Introduction to Canto i.

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A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on art and mountains

Like the dew on the mountain, Like the foam on the river, Like the bubble on the fountain, Thou art gone, and forever!

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Lady of the Lake. Canto iii. Stanza 16.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on dreams and good

To all, to each, a fair good-night, And pleasing dreams, and slumbers light!

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Marmion, 1808

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on doubt

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And better had they ne'er been born, Who read to doubt, or read to scorn.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: The Monastery. 1820, Chap. xii.

Contributed by: Zaady

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