Sir Walter Scott

1771 - 1832

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on soldiers and success

What can they see in the longest kingly line in Europe, save that it runs back to a successful soldier?

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Woodstock. 1826, ch. 37

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on fate and time

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"Lambe them, lads! lambe them!" a cant phrase of the time derived from the fate of Dr. Lambe, an astrologer and quack, who was knocked on the head by the rabble in Charles the First's time.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Peveril of the Peak. Chap. xlii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on life and men

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But search the land of living men, Where wilt thou find their like again?

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Marmion, 1808, canto i, st. ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on architecture, history, knowledge, lawyers, and literature

A lawyer without history or literature is a mechanic, a mere working mason; if he possesses some knowledge of these, he may venture to call himself an architect.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Guy Mannering. 1815, Chap. xxxvii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on life, love, and pain

Lightly from fair to fair he flew, And loved to plead, lament, and sue; Suit lightly won, and short-lived pain, For monarchs seldom sigh in vain.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on grace

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And ne'er did Grecian chisel trace A Nymph, a Naiad, or a Grace Of finer form or lovelier face.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Lady of the Lake. 1810, Canto i. Stanza 18.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on earth, feeling, and heaven

Some feelings are to mortals given With less of earth in them than heaven.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Lady of the Lake. Canto ii. Stanza 22.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on proverbs and words

There is a southern proverb - fine words butter no parsnips.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: The Legend of Montrose, 1819

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on flattery, losing, poets, and simplicity

Ne'er Was flattery lost on poet's ear; A simple race! they waste their toil For the vain tribute of a smile.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Lay of the Last Minstrel, 1805, canto iv, conclusion

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott

A foot more light, a step more true, Ne'er from the heath-flower dash'd the dew.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Lady of the Lake. 1810, Canto i. Stanza 18.

Contributed by: Zaady

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