Sir Walter Scott

1771 - 1832

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott

The sun never sets on the immense empire of Charles V.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Life of Napoleon. 1827.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on country, men, and tears

But woe awaits a country when She sees the tears of bearded men.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on losing, poets, and simplicity

For ne'er was lost on poet's ear: A simple race! They waste their toil For the vain tribute of a smile.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: The Lay of the Last Minstrel, 1805, Canto v. Stanza 1.

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A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on joy, respect, and surprises

Respect was mingled with surprise, And the stern joy which warriors feel In foemen worthy of their steel.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Lady of the Lake. Canto i. Stanza 21.

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A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on fear, hope, love, and tears

The rose is fairest when 't is budding new, And hope is brightest when it dawns from fears. The rose is sweetest wash'd with morning dew, And love is loveliest when embalm'd in tears.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Lady of the Lake. 1810, Canto iv. Stanza 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott

The rose is fairest when 'tis budding new.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: The Lady of the Lake, 1810

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A Quote by Sir Walter Scott

Rouse the lion from his lair.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: The Talisman. 1825, Chap. vi.

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A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on senses

in

Scared out of his seven senses.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Rob Roy. Chap. xxxiv.

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A Quote by Sir Walter Scott

My foot is on my native heath, and my name is MacGregor.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Rob Roy. 1817, Chap. xxxiv.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on death, heart, home, life, power, soul, wealth, and wishes

Breathes there the man, with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, This is my own, my native land! Whose heart hath ne'er within him burn'd, As home his footsteps he hath turn'd From wandering on a foreign strand! If such there breathe, go mark him well; For him no Minstrel raptures swell; High though his titles, proud his name, Boundless his wealth as wish can claim; Despite those titles, power, and pelf, The wretch, concentred all in self, Living, shall forfeit fair renown, And, doubly dying, shall go down To the vile dust, from whence he sprung, Unwept, unhonor'd, and unsung.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: The Lay of the Last Minstrel. Canto vi. Stanza 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

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