Sir Thomas More

1478 - 1535

A Quote by Sir Thomas More

As he drew his beard aside upon placing his head on the block: This hath not offended the king.

Sir Thomas More (1478 - 1535)

Source: Bacon, Apothegms

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas More on men, people, persuasion, and remedies

Plato by a goodly similitude declareth, why wise men refrain to meddle in the commonwealth. For when they see the people swarm into the streets, and daily wet to the skin with rain, and yet cannot persuade them to go out of the rain, they do keep themselves within their houses, seeing they cannot remedy the folly of the people.

Sir Thomas More (1478 - 1535)

Source: Utopia, 1516, Concerning the Best State of a Commonwealth

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas More on gold, men, thought, and value

They wander much to hear that gold, which in itself is so useless a thing, should be everywhere so much esteemed, that even men for whom it was made, and by whom it has its value, should yet be thought of less value than it is.

Sir Thomas More (1478 - 1535)

Source: Utopia, 1516, Of Jewels and Wealth

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas More

On mounting the scaffold, prior to his beheading. I pray you master Lieutenant, see me safe up, and for my coming down let me shift for my self.

Sir Thomas More (1478 - 1535)

Source: Roper, Life of Sir Thomas More (1935), p. 69.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas More on lawyers and people

They have no lawyers among them, for they consider them as a sort of people whose profession it is to disguise matters.

Sir Thomas More (1478 - 1535)

Source: Utopia, 1516, Of Law and Magistrates

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A Quote by Sir Thomas More on money

in

A little wanton money, which burned out the bottom of his purse.

Sir Thomas More (1478 - 1535)

Source: Works, c. 1530

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas More on day, home, practice, simplicity, and soul

The ordinary arts we practice every day at home are of more importance to the soul than their simplicity might suggest.

Sir Thomas More (1478 - 1535)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas More on heaven

in

The way to heaven out of all places is of like length and distance.

Sir Thomas More (1478 - 1535)

Source: Utopia, 1516

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas More on evil, good, and men

For men use, if they have an evil turn, to write it in marble; and whoso doth us a good turn we write it in dust.

Sir Thomas More (1478 - 1535)

Source: Richard III and His Miserable End, 1543

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas More on compassion, nature, and sentimentality

The Utopians feel that slaughtering our fellow creatures gradually destroys the sense of compassion, which is the finest sentiment of which our human nature is capable.

Sir Thomas More (1478 - 1535)

Source: Utopia, 1516

Contributed by: Zaady

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