Sir Thomas Browne

1605 - 1682

A Quote by Sir Thomas Browne on anger, dissent, and judgment

I could never divide myself from any man upon the difference of an opinion, or he angry with his judgment for not agreeing with me in that, from which perhaps within a few days I should dissent my self.

Sir Thomas Browne (1605 - 1682)

Source: Religio Medici

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas Browne on divinity

There is surely a piece of divinity in us, something that was before the elements, and owes no homage unto the sun.

Sir Thomas Browne (1605 - 1682)

Source: Religio Medici, 1870

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas Browne on belief, faith, philosophy, and possibility

To believe only possibilities is not Faith, but mere Philosophy.

Sir Thomas Browne (1605 - 1682)

Source: Religio Medici

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas Browne on solitude

Be able to be alone. Lose not the advantage of solitude, . . . but delight to be alone and single with Omnipresency. . . .

Sir Thomas Browne (1605 - 1682)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas Browne

Be substantially great in thyself, and more than thou appearest unto others.

Sir Thomas Browne (1605 - 1682)

Source: Christian Morals, 1716

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas Browne on charity and wealth

Be charitable before wealth makes thee covetous.

Sir Thomas Browne (1605 - 1682)

Source: Christian Morals, 1716

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas Browne on life and purity

Life is pure flame, and we live by an invisible sun within us.

Sir Thomas Browne (1605 - 1682)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas Browne on country

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Every Country hath its Machiavel.

Sir Thomas Browne (1605 - 1682)

Source: Religio Medici, 1642

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas Browne on enemies

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Yet is every man his own greatest enemy, and as it were his own executioner.

Sir Thomas Browne (1605 - 1682)

Source: Religio Medici, part 2, section 4 (1635)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas Browne on death and life

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Where life is more terrible than death, it is then the truest valor to dare to live.

Sir Thomas Browne (1605 - 1682)

Contributed by: Zaady

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