Sir Philip Sidney

1554 - 1586

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on love, mind, and pleasure

Leave me, O Love, which reachest but to dust, And thou, my mind, aspire to higher things; Grow rich in that which never taketh rust; Whatever fades, but fading pleasure brings.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Source: The Arcadia, 1580

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on children, men, and play

He cometh unto with a tale which holdeth children from play, and old men from the chimney corner.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Source: The Defense of Poesy, 1580

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney

My dear, my better half.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Source: The Arcadia, 1580

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney

Either I will find a way, or I will make one.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on beginning, bravery, and danger

A true knight is fuller of bravery in the midst, than in the beginning of danger.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on evil

in

No sword bites so fiercely as an evil tongue.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on excellence, knowledge, and learning

Each excellent thing, once learned, serves for a measure of all other knowledge.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on vices

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Fearfulness, contrary to all other vices, maketh a man think the better of another, the worse of himself.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on defense and weapons

Commonly they must use their feet for defense whose only weapon is their tongue.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on children, legacy, and speech

The best legacy I can leave my children is free speech, and the example of using it.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Contributed by: Zaady

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