Sir Philip Sidney

1554 - 1586

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney

Have I caught my heav'nly jewel.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Source: Astrophel and Stella, 1591

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on heart and nature

It is the nature of the strong heart, that like the palm tree it strives ever upwards when it is most burdened.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney

Open suspecting of others comes of secretly condemning ourselves.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on food and knowledge

Sweet food of sweetly uttered knowledge.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Source: The Defense of Poesy, 1580

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on silence

in

Shallow brooks murmur most, deep and silent slide away.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Source: The Arcadia, 1580

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on children, men, and play

With a tale, forsooth, he cometh unto you; with a tale which holdeth children from play, and old men from the chimney corner.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Source: Defence of Poesie, written 1579-80; published 1595

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on heart

in

Biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite: "Fool!" said my muse to me, "look in thy heart, and write."

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Source: Astrophel and Stella, 1591

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on happiness

It is great happiness to be praised of them who are most praiseworthy.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on death

in

To be rhymed to death as is said to be done in Ireland.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on certainty, indifference, judgment, peace, sleep, wealth, and wit

Come, Sleep! O Sleep, the certain knot of peace, The baiting-place of wit, the balm of woe, The poor man's wealth, the prisoner's release, Th' indifferent judge between the high and low.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Source: Sonnet XXXIX

Contributed by: Zaady

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