Shui-ch'ing Tzu

between 1600 & 1911 -

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on fame, fortune, life, love, nature, originality, passion, and taoism

Riches, fame, and fortune are as ephemeral as lightning, The passion of sexual love and childish piety will vanish like flames. Do not crave and be the master of your own life, Cultivate the Tao and there will be gods to help your karma. Do not lose your original nature and the dust of the earthly realm will vanish, The sky will reveal the circular bright moon.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 136

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu

Those who can dissolve craving are extraordinary persons. They are one in tens of thousands.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 131

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on action, change, intelligence, knowledge, mind, mistakes, purity, spirit, stillness, and taoism

. . . knowledge emerges in (humans). Opposed to knowledge is the spirit. The spirit is formless and is incomprehensible to mundane thoughts. . . . Knowledge is active, mischievous, and intelligent. It changes constantly. Spirit, on the other hand, is the master of humankind. Its origin is in wu-chi. . . . It is never born and it never dies. The spirit tends toward purity and stillness. Knowledge tends toward action and disturbs the mind so that it cannot be still. . . . Recognize the difference between the human mind and the mind of Tao. Do not mistake the human mind for the mind of Tao, and knowledge for the spirit.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 35-37

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on death, words, and taoism

The Tao that is coded in words is dead. The teachings of the Tao are so precious and important that they cannot be revealed in the written word.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 30

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on death, life, and understanding

The gate that gives me life is the gate that gives me death. Only a few understand this intuitively.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 18

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on harmony and universe

Harmony with the universe and floating on the gentle wind will be your true pleasures.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 91

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on harmony, humanity, laws, nature, purity, and taoism

The Jade Pure, the Most Pure, and the High Pure Realms represent three levels of enlightenment. To rise to the Jade Pure Realm is to attain wu-chi, the highest form of enlightenment. This is complete union with the Tao. To enter the Realm of the Great Pure is to exist in a state in which subject and object are differentiated but are integral parts of the Tao. It is a lesser form of enlightenment. To attain the Realm of the High Pure is to exist in harmony with nature and humanity, to live according to the laws of nature, and to embody the highest virtues of humanity. This is the lowest form of enlightenment.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 7

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on clarity, desires, emptiness, existence, heaven, mind, and stillness

True emptiness exists when the mind is clear and all forms have disappeared. Externally, there are no objects. Internally, there is no mind. There is only emptiness. In this state even emptiness does not exist. In true emptiness there is no space, no desire, no will; there are no appearances, no thoughts. All realms of existence are dissolved. In absolute stillness there is no self and no other. There is only Earlier Heaven in its undifferentiated whole.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 69

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on awareness, nature, and attachment

Be aware of the ephemeral nature of material things. Lose your attachment to them.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 115

Contributed by: Zaady

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