Seth Godin

A Quote by Seth Godin on shifts, easy, remarkable, and small is the new big

How Dare You?

How can you squander even one more day not taking advantage of the greatest shifts of our generation? How dare you settle for less when the world has made it so easy for your to be remarkable?

Seth Godin

Source: small is the new big

Contributed by: Adie

A Quote by Seth Godin on patience and customers

The media wants overnight successes (so they have someone to tear down). Ignore them. Ignore the early adopter critics that never have enough to play with. Ignore your investors that want proven tactics and predictable instant results. Listen instead to your real customers, to your vision and make something for the long haul. Because that's how long it's going to take, guys.

Seth Godin

Source: The secret of the web (hint: it's a virtue): http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2008/08/the-secret-of-t.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Seth Godin on storytelling and marketing

Question: What is an example of company that created a brand by conducting a dialogue with customers?

Answer: You don’t know many either, do you Guy? Ahh, we agree! I think that while markets are conversations, marketing is a story. Starbucks creates conversations among customers, so does Apple. The NYSE makes a fortune permitting people to interact with each other. But great marketing is storytelling, and if you’ve been to a Broadway show lately, you’ll notice that audience participation is discouraged. That doesn’t mean that great playwrights don’t listen! They do. They, like great marketers, listen relentlessly. They engage in offline conversations constantly. They poll and they do censuses and most important, they have true conversations with small groups of real people. But THEN, they tell a story.

Seth Godin

Source: How to Change the World: Ten Questions with Seth Godin: http://blog.guykawasaki.com/2006/08/ten_questions_w.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Seth Godin on success

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Question: What are the five things that enabled you to be successful?

Answer: If we define success as the ability to make a living doing what I do, I’d say the following:

1. No ulterior motive. I rarely do A as a calculated tactic to get B. I do A because I believe in A, or it excites me or it’s the right thing to do. That’s it. No secret agendas.

2. I don’t think my audience owes me anything. It’s always their turn.
   
3. I’m in a hurry to make mistakes and get feedback and get that next idea out there. I’m not in a hurry, at all, to finish the “bigger” project, to get to the finish line.

4. I do things where I actually think I’m right, as opposed to where I think succeeding will make me successful. When you think you’re right, it’s more fun and your passion shows through.

5. I’ve tried to pare down my day so that the stuff I actually do is pretty well leveraged. That, and I show up. Showing up is underrated.

Seth Godin

Source: How to Change the World: Ten Questions with Seth Godin: http://blog.guykawasaki.com/2006/08/ten_questions_w.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Seth Godin on business, books, and reading

So, how to read a business book:

1. Decide, before you start, that you’re going to change three things about what you do all day at work. Then, as you’re reading, find the three things and do it. The goal of the reading, then, isn’t to persuade you to change, it’s to help you choose what to change.

2. If you’re going to invest a valuable asset (like time), go ahead and make it productive. Use a postit or two, or some index cards or a highlighter. Not to write down stuff so you can forget it later, but to create marching orders. It’s simple: if three weeks go by and you haven’t taken action on what you’ve written down, you wasted your time.

3. It’s not about you, it’s about the next person. The single best use of a business book is to help someone else. Sharing what you read, handing the book to a person who needs it... pushing those around you to get in sync and to take action--that’s the main reason it’s a book, not a video or a seminar. A book is a souvenir and a container and a motivator and an easily leveraged tool. Hoarding books makes them worth less, not more.

Seth Godin

Source: How to read a business book: http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2008/05/how-to-read-a-b.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Seth Godin on marketing, web, internet, and advertising

If a newspaper, a radio station or a TV station doesn't please advertisers, it disappears. It exists to make you (the marketer) happy.

That's the reason the medium (and its rules) exist. To please the advertisers.

But the Net is different.

It wasn't invented by business people, and it doesn't exist to help your company make money.

It's entirely possible it could be used that way, but it doesn't owe you anything. The question to ask isn't, "but how does this help me?" as if you have some sort of say in the matter. You don't get a vote on whether Google succeeds or whether your customers erect spam filters.

The question to ask is, "how are people (the people I need to reach, interact with and tell stories to) going to use this new power and how can I help them achieve their goals?"

Seth Godin

Source: The web doesn't care: http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2008/07/the-web-doesnt.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Seth Godin on action

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More than anything else, I think prospects, customers and citizens watch what you do more than they listen to what you say.

Seth Godin

Source: Watching and Listening: http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2008/03/watching-and-li.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Seth Godin on vision and persistence

There's a myth that all you need to do is outline your vision and prove it's right—then, quite suddenly, people will line up and support you.

In fact, the opposite is true. Remarkable visions and genuine insight are always met with resistance. And when you start to make progress, your efforts are met with even more resistance. Products, services, career paths... whatever it is, the forces for mediocrity will align to stop you, forgiving no errors and never backing down until it's over.

If it were any other way, it would be easy. And if it were any other way, everyone would do it and your work would ultimately be devalued. The yin and yang are clear: without people pushing against your quest to do something worth talking about, it's unlikely it would be worth the journey. Persist.

Seth Godin

Source: The Forces of Mediocrity: http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2008/03/the-forces-of-m.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Seth Godin on fundamentalism, curiosity, and world views

Fundamentalist is a person who considers whether a fact is acceptable to their faith before they explore it. As opposed to a curious person who explores first and then considers whether or not they want to accept the ramifications.

Seth Godin

Source: Curious: http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2008/01/curious.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Seth Godin on market, conversations, marketing, storytelling, and story

I think that while markets are conversations, marketing is a story. Starbucks creates conversations among customers, so does Apple. The NYSE makes a fortune permitting people to interact with each other. But great marketing is storytelling, and if you’ve been to a Broadway show lately, you’ll notice that audience participation is discouraged. That doesn’t mean that great playwrights don’t listen! They do. They, like great marketers, listen relentlessly. They engage in offline conversations constantly. They poll and they do censuses and most important, they have true conversations with small groups of real people. But THEN, they tell a story.

Seth Godin

Source: Ten Questions with Seth Godin: http://blog.guykawasaki.com/2006/08/ten_questions_w.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

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