Samuel Rogers

1763 - 1855

A Quote by Samuel Rogers on charm, gloom, madness, and melancholy

Go! you may call it madness, folly; You shall not chase my gloom away! There 's such a charm in melancholy I would not if I could be gay.

Samuel Rogers (1763 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Rogers on memory and time

Sweet Memory! wafted by thy gentle gale, Oft up the stream of Time I turn my sail.

Samuel Rogers (1763 - 1855)

Source: The Pleasures of Memory. Part ii. i.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Rogers on feeling, hope, love, memory, and music

We love music for the buried hopes, the garnered memories, the tender feelings it can summon at a touch.

Samuel Rogers (1763 - 1855)

Source: Epigram.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Rogers

Mine be a cot beside the hill; A beehive's hum shall soothe my ear; A willowy brook that turns a mill, With many a fall, shall linger near.

Samuel Rogers (1763 - 1855)

Source: A Wish.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Rogers on feeling, music, and soul

The soul of music slumbers in the shell Till waked and kindled by the master's spell; And feeling hearts, touch them but rightly, pour A thousand melodies unheard before!

Samuel Rogers (1763 - 1855)

Source: Human Life.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Rogers on time

in

To vanish in the chinks that Time has made.

Samuel Rogers (1763 - 1855)

Source: Pæstum.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Rogers on heart

in

Ward has no heart, they say, but I deny it: He has a heart, and gets his speeches by it.

Samuel Rogers (1763 - 1855)

Source: Epigram.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Rogers on death and love

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Those that he loved so long and sees no more, Loved and still loves,-not dead, but gone before,- He gathers round him.

Samuel Rogers (1763 - 1855)

Source: Human Life.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Rogers on love

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To know her was to love her.

Samuel Rogers (1763 - 1855)

Source: Jacqueline

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Rogers on good

in

The good are better made by ill, As odours crushed are sweeter still.

Samuel Rogers (1763 - 1855)

Source: Stanza 3.

Contributed by: Zaady

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