Samuel Johnson

1709 - 1784

A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on books

in

Books that you may carry to the fire, and hold readily in your hand, are the most useful after all.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Source: Sir John Hawkins, Life of Johnson, 1787, Apothegms

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A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on ideas

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That fellow seems to me to possess but one idea, and that is a wrong one.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Source: Life of Johnson (Boswell). Vol. iii. Chap. v. 1770.

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A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on certainty and uncertainty

He is no wise man that will quit a certainty for an uncertainty.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Source: The Idler. No. 57.

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A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on anticipation, change, happiness, life, wishes, and world

Such is the state of life, that none are happy but by the anticipation of change: the change itself is nothing; when we have made it, the next wish is to change again. The world is not yet exhausted; let me see something tomorrow which I never saw before.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

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A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on idleness

If you are idle, be not solitary; if you are solitary, be not idle.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

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A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson

Whatever you have spend less.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

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A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on business, kindness, and life

To cultivate kindness is a valuable part of the business of life.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

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A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on cheating, suffering, and trust

It is better to suffer wrong than to do it, and happier to be sometimes cheated than not to trust.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

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A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on good

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He who waits to do a great deal of good at once, will never do anything.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

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A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson

A man may be so much of everything that he is nothing of anything.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Contributed by: Zaady

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