Samuel Eliot Morison

1887 - 1976

A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on compromise, democracy, fatherhood, and government

Franklin may . . . be considered one of the founding fathers of American democracy, since no democratic government can last long without conciliation and compromise.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: The Wisdom of Benjamin Franklin, 1961

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on experience and purity

He [Columbus] enjoyed long stretches of pure delight such as only a seaman may know, and moments of high, proud exultation that only a discoverer can experience.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: Admiral of the Ocean Sea, 1942, ch. 49

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on america, bitterness, colors, problems, slavery, solution, and yielding

The freedmen were not really free in 1865, nor are most of their descendants really f ree in 1965. Slavery was but one aspect of a race and color problem that is still far from solution here, or anywhere. In America particularly, the grapes of wrath have not yet yielded all their bitter vintage.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: The Oxford History of the American People, 1965, ch. 33

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A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on trade

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On her first voyage, the Columbia had solved the riddle of the China trade. On her second, empire followed in the wake.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: Maritime History of Massachusetts, 1921, ch.4

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A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on power and war

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No big modern war has been won without preponderant sea power; and, conversely, very few rebellions of maritime provinces have succeeded without acquiring sea power.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: The Oxford History of the American People, 1965, ch. 40

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A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on america, brevity, freedom, military, nations, and power

But sea power has never led to despotism. The nations that have enjoyed sea power even for a brief period-Athens, Scandinavia, the Netherlands, England, the United States-are those that have preserved freedom for themselves and have given it to others. Of the despotism to which unrestrained military power leads we have plenty of examples from Alexander to Mao.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: The Oxford History of the American People, 1965, ch. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on ambition, desires, emotion, passion, religion, tenacity, and world

A tough but nervous, tenacious but restless race [the Yankees]; materially ambitious, yet prone to introspection, and subject to waves of religious emotion. . . . A race whose typical member is eternally torn between a passion for righteousness and a desire to get on in the world.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: Maritime History of Massachusetts, 1921, ch. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on fighting, freedom, goals, happiness, independence, liberty, life, mistakes, and revolution

Make no mistake; the American Revolution was not fought to obtain freedom, but to preserve the liberties that Americans already had as colonials. Independence was no conscious goal, secretly nurtured in cellar or jungle by bearded conspirators, but a reluctant last resort, to preserve "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness."

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: The Oxford History of the American People, 1965, ch. 12

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on achievement, america, architecture, balance, bravery, brevity, colors, dance, gold, harmony, music, nature, poets, purpose, songs, and world

These clipper ships of the early 1850's were built of wood in shipyards from Rockland in Maine to Baltimore. These architects, like poets who transmute nature's message into song, obeyed what wind and wave had taught them, to create the noblest of all sailing vessels, and the most beautiful creations of man in America. With no extraneous ornament except a figurehead, a bit of carving and a few lines of gold leaf, their one purpose of speed over the great ocean routes was achieved by perfect balance of spars and sails to the curving lines of the smooth black hull; and this harmony of mass, form and color was practiced to the music of dancing waves and of brave winds whistling in the rigging. These were our Gothic cathedrals, our Parthenon; but monuments carved from snow. For a few brief years they flashed their splendor around the world, then disappeared with the finality of the wild pigeon.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: The Oxford History of the American People, 1965, ch. 36

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on beauty, challenge, future, independence, inspiration, men, oppression, revolution, words, world, and worth

If the American Revolution had produced nothing but the Declaration of Independence, it would have been worth while. . . . The beauty and cogency of the preamble, reaching back to remotest antiquity and forward so an indefinite future, have lifted the hearts of millions of men and will continue to do. . . . These words are more revolutionary than anything written by Robespierre, Marx, or Lenin, more explosive than the atom, a continual challenge to ourselves as well as an inspiration to the oppressed of all the world.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: The Oxford History of the American People, 1965, ch. 14

Contributed by: Zaady

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