Samuel Butler

1612 - 1680

A Quote by Samuel Butler on existence, god, past, and respect

It has been said that though God cannot alter the past, historians can; it is perhaps because they can be useful to Him in this respect that He tolerates their existence.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Erewhon Revisited, ch 14

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on art, farewells, good, hope, money, and work

As soon as any art is pursued with a view of money, then farewell, in ninety-nine cases out of a hundred, all hope of genuine good work.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Notebooks

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler

If we attend continually and promptly to the little that we can do, we shall ere long be surprised to find how little remains that we cannot do.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Notebooks.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on men

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Men are seldom more commonplace than on supreme occasions.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on death and immortality

To himself everyone is immortal; he may know that he is going to die, but he can never know that he is dead.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on apologies, books, devil, and god

An apology for the Devil: It must be remembered that we have only heard one side of the case. God has written all the books.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Notebooks, An Apology for the Devil

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on dogs and pleasure

The great pleasure of a dog is that you may make a fool of yourself with him and not only will he not scold you, but he will make a fool of himself too.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on faith

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You can do very little with faith, but you can do nothing without it.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on authority, credulity, doubt, faith, life, persistence, and reason

. . . There can be no doubt about faith and not reason being the ultima ratio. Even Euclid, who has laid himself as little open to the charge of credulity as any writer who ever lived, cannot get beyond this. He has no demonstrable first premise. He requires postulates and axioms which transcend demonstration, and without which he can do nothing. His superstructure indeed is demonstration, but his ground his faith. Nor again can he get further than telling a man he is a fool if he persists in differing from him. He says "which is absurd," and declines to discuss the matter further. Faith and authority, therefore, prove to be as necessary for him as for anyone else.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: The Way of All Flesh.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on friendship and money

Friendship is like money, easier made than kept.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Contributed by: Zaady

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