Sam Keen

A Quote by Sam Keen on war, wounded, sissies, sword, test, men, conquest, dying, sensitive, and fight

Men have all been culturally designed with conquest, killing, or dying in mind. Even sissies. Early in life a boy learns that he must be prepared to fight or be called a sissy, a girl. Many of the creative men I know were sissies. They were too sensitive, too compassionate, to fight. And most of them grew up feeling they were somehow inferior and flunked the manhood test. I suspect many writers are still showing the bullies on the block that the pen is mightier than the sword. The test shaped us, whether we passed or flunked.
We are all war-wounded.

Sam Keen

Source: Fire in the Belly (1991)

Contributed by: bajarbattu

A Quote by Sam Keen on love and perfection

We come to love not by finding a perfect person, but by learning to see an imperfect person perfectly.

Sam Keen

Contributed by: Charles

A Quote by Sam Keen on love, healing, world, passion, fidelity, and relationships

The lover heals the world not by a vague and abstract love for everybody and everything, but by becoming passionate and vowing fidelity to concrete relationships, persons, institutions, and places.

Sam Keen

Contributed by: intrigue

A Quote by Sam Keen on mythology

In a way, human beings have never been part of the natural order; we're not biological in the normal sense. Normal biological animals stop eating when they're not hungry and stop breeding when there is no sense in breeding. By contrast, human beings are what I think of as "biomythic" animals: we're controlled largely by the stories we tell. When we get the story wrong, we get out of harmony with the rest of the natural order. For a long time, our unnatural beahvior didn't threaten the natural world, but now it does.

Sam Keen

Source: 'On the Flying Trapeze: Sam Keen Ponders How to Be Free.' - The Sun [Oct 99]

Contributed by: J-ZEN

A Quote by Sam Keen on change, destruction, earth, economics, habits, ideas, inventions, love, men, soul, success, vices, virtue, wonder, and work

The Greeks invented the idea of nemesis to show how any single virtue, stubbornly maintained gradually changes into a destructive vice. Our success, our industry, our habit of work have produced our economic nemesis. Work made modern men great, but now threatens to usurp our souls, to inundate the earth in things and trash, to destroy our capacity to love and wonder.

Sam Keen

Contributed by: Zaady

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