Russell Targ

A Quote by Russell Targ on realization, teacher, guru, awakening, enlightenment, grace, serendipity, and transmission

When I write about "realizations," I am describing a state in which a practitioner has wisdom of who she or he is, and has embodied that wisdom; it has become integrated into daily life, thoughts, and activities. We often view "awakening" as first step towards such realization. Awakening can occur in the blink of an eye, frequently through the direct, heart-opening (heart-breaking) transmission of grace from an awakened teacher.

Russell Targ

Source: Limitless Mind: A Guide to Remote Viewing and Transformation of Consciousness, Pages: 15

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Russell Targ on talent, psi, and practice

We often say that psi is like musical ability: it is widely distributed in the populate, and everyone has some ability and can participate to some extent -- in the same way that the most nonmusical person can learn to play a little Mozart on the piano. On the other hand, there is no substitute for innate talent, and there is no substitute for practice.

Russell Targ

Source: Limitless Mind: A Guide to Remote Viewing and Transformation of Consciousness, Pages: 75

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Russell Targ on nagarjuna, buddha, buddhism, logic, aristotelian logic, middle path, four-valued logic, two-valued logic, and paradox

I believe that we are neither a "self" nor "not a self," but that we are awareness residing as a body. This is the sort of apparent paradox about who we are that may not be solvable within the framework of what we call "Aristotelian two-valued logic" -- the logic system basic to all of Western analytical thought. In the two-valued logic, we frame our reality with questions like "Are we mortal or immortal?" "Is the mind or soul part of the body?" or "Is light made of waves or particles?" But none of these have "yes" or "no" answers. The exclusion of a middle ground between the poles of Aristotelian logic is the source of much confusion. Other logic systems have been suggested in Buddhist writings; the great second-century dharma master and teacher Nagarjuna introduced a four-valued logic system in which statements about the world can be (1) true, (2) not true, (3) both true and not true, (4) neither true nor not true -- which Nagarjuna believed was the usual case -- thereby illumination what is known as the Buddhist Middle Path. According to Nagarjuna, the Buddha first taught that the world is real. He next taught that it is unreal. To the more astute students, he taught that it is both real and not real. And to those who were furthest along the path, he taught that the world is neither real nor not real, which is what we would say today.

Russell Targ

Source: Limitless Mind: A Guide to Remote Viewing and Transformation of Consciousness, Pages: 19-20

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Russell Targ on psi and remote viewing

We know from the experimental data of psi research that viewer in the laboratory can focus his or her attention anywhere on the planet and, about two-thirds of the time, describe what is there.

Russell Targ

Source: Limitless Mind: A Guide to Remote Viewing and Transformation of Consciousness, Pages: 91

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

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