Robert Burton

1577 - 1640

A Quote by Robert Burton

All our geese are swans.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on devil and god

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Where God hath a temple, the Devil will have a chapel.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on cities and worship

Isocrates adviseth Demonicus, when he came to a strange city, to worship by all means the gods of the place.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on angels, good, and life

Every man hath a good and a bad angel attending on him in particular, all his life long.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on adversity and men

Seneca thinks the gods are well pleased when they see great men contending with adversity.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on world

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If the world will be gulled, let it be gulled.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on vices

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Hannibal, as he had mighty virtues, so had he many vices; he had two distinct persons in him.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on cities, happiness, peace, time, and war

The commonwealth of Venice in their armoury have this inscription: "Happy is that city which in time of peace thinks of war."

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on play

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"Let me not live," saith Aretine's Antonia, "if I had not rather hear thy discourse than see a play."

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on dogs and good

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Like a hog, or dog in the manger, he doth only keep it because it shall do nobody else good, hurting himself and others.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

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