Robert Burton

1577 - 1640

A Quote by Robert Burton on adversity and men

Seneca thinks the gods are well pleased when they see great men contending with adversity.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on world

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If the world will be gulled, let it be gulled.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on vices

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Hannibal, as he had mighty virtues, so had he many vices; he had two distinct persons in him.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on cities, happiness, peace, time, and war

The commonwealth of Venice in their armoury have this inscription: "Happy is that city which in time of peace thinks of war."

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on play

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"Let me not live," saith Aretine's Antonia, "if I had not rather hear thy discourse than see a play."

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on dogs and good

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Like a hog, or dog in the manger, he doth only keep it because it shall do nobody else good, hurting himself and others.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on earth and heaven

And this is that Homer's golden chain, which reacheth down from heaven to earth, by which every creature is annexed, and depends on his Creator.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on time

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I had not time to lick it into form, as a bear doth her young ones.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on fatherhood and sons

Diogenes struck the father when the son swore.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on losing

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Like Æsop's fox, when he had lost his tail, would have all his fellow foxes cut off theirs.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

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