Robert Burton

1577 - 1640

A Quote by Robert Burton on abuse, body, disease, divinity, excellence, gold, health, men, philosophy, remedies, soul, and violence

Tobacco, divine, rare, super excellent tobacco, which goes beyond all their panaceas, potable gold, and philosopher's stones, a sovereign remedy to all diseases. . . . But, as it is commonly abused by most men, which take it as tinkers do ale, 'tis a plague, a mischief, a violent purger of goods, lands, health, hellish, devilish, and damned tobacco, the ruin and overthrow of body and soul.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on love and power

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To enlarge or illustrate this power and effect of love is to set a candle in the sun.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on humility

They are proud in humility; proud in that they are not proud.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on horses

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Like him in Æsop, he whipped his horses withal, and put his shoulder to the wheel.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton

Though it rain daggers with their points downward.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on religion

One religion is as true as another.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton

Rob Peter, and pay Paul.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on fashion

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He is only fantastical that is not in fashion.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton

They do not live but linger.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on books, history, horses, life, and men

John. Mayor, in the first book of his "History of Scotland," contends much for the wholesomeness of oaten bread; it was objected to him, then living at Paris, that his countrymen fed on oats and base grain. . . . And yet Wecker out of Galen calls it horse-meat, and fitter juments than men to feed on.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

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