Robert Burton

1577 - 1640

A Quote by Robert Burton

Like the watermen that row one way and look another.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton

No rule is so general, which admits not some exception.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on confession and investment

We can make majors and officers every year, but not scholars; kings can invest knights and barons, as Sigismund the emperor confessed.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on fame

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Every schoolboy hath that famous testament of Grunnius Corocotta Porcellus at his fingers' end.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on mountains

See one promontory (said Socrates of old), one mountain, one sea, one river, and see all.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton

Smile with an intent to do mischief, or cozen him whom he salutes.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on certainty

Fabricius finds certain spots and clouds in the sun.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on betrayal and style

It is most true, stylus virum arguit, - our style betrays us.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on death and madness

A mere madness, to live like a wretch and die rich.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on abuse, body, disease, divinity, excellence, gold, health, men, philosophy, remedies, soul, and violence

Tobacco, divine, rare, super excellent tobacco, which goes beyond all their panaceas, potable gold, and philosopher's stones, a sovereign remedy to all diseases. . . . But, as it is commonly abused by most men, which take it as tinkers do ale, 'tis a plague, a mischief, a violent purger of goods, lands, health, hellish, devilish, and damned tobacco, the ruin and overthrow of body and soul.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

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