Robert Burton

1577 - 1640

A Quote by Robert Burton on water

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The miller sees not all the water that goes by his mill.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on kindness, people, wine, and women

I may not here omit those two main plagues and common dotages of human kind, wine and women, which have infatuated and besotted myriads of people; they go commonly together.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on women

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Women wear the breeches.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on clarity

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From this it is clear how much the pen is worse than the sword (Hinc quam sit calamus sævior ense patet.)

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton

A blow with a word strikes deeper than a blow with a sword.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on feeling

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I would help others, out of a fellow-feeling.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on earth, hell, and lawyers

Our wrangling lawyers . . . are so litigious and busy here on earth, that I think they will plead their clients' causes hereafter, - some of them in hell.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton on learning

Out of too much learning become mad.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton

Going as if he trod upon eggs.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burton

Everything, saith Epictetus, hath two handles, - the one to be held by, the other not.

Robert Burton (1577 - 1640)

Source: Anatomy of Melancholy

Contributed by: Zaady

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