Robert Augustus Masters

A Quote by Robert Augustus Masters on pain, suffering, and intimacy

If you want to end your suffering enter your pain.

Robert Augustus Masters

Source: Divine Dynamite

Contributed by: Sharon

A Quote by Robert Augustus Masters on 5-meo, drugs, darkness shining wild, lucid dreams, and fear

I spent most of that first post-5-Meo night sitting up in bed (Nancy slept on and off beside me), helplessly absorbed in extremely gripping, three-dimensional replays of the horror I had experienced, now and then trying to comfort myself with the thought that this wouldn't, couldn't, last for more than a few nights. The waves of rembrance did not come gently. I was throbbing, shaking, struggling to find some semblance of calm in the psychospiritual riptides that were tossing me about like a piece of shore-bereft driftwood. A hellride minus an offramp.

Hour after hour I endured, feeling as though I would never return from the madness that was infiltrating me. Finally, just before dawn, I fell asleep and very soon found myself in a lucid dream.

I had often had such dreams, frequently using them as portals for all kinds of adventure and experimentation. As such, they were normally quite pleasing to be in; I would know that the body I "had" in the dream was not my actual physical body, and so could then freely engage in activities that would mean disaster or even Death in the "waking" state. If I was afraid in a regular dream and then became lucid during it, I coudl usually face the fear, interacting with it's dream-form until some kind of resolution or integration occured.

But not now. Yes, I knew I was dreaming, but I could not work with the fear therein. The dream was saturated with an enormous, otherworldly terror which was coupled with savagely hallucinatory disorientation. In the midst of this I stood, my dreambody but a ghostly sieve for its surroundings. I knew that if I left the dream, I would still be in the very same state.

At last, I let myself go fully into the dream, despite my conviction that I very likely would not return. Now I was completely inside it, utterly lost, immersed in an edgeless domain of look-alike, spike-headed waveforms, each one sentient and subtly scaly, moving protoplasmically in endless procession in all directions. Just like my 5-Meo setting, but without the speed.

Suddenly, I was overcome by a completely unexpected, rapidly expanding compassion. All fear vanished. A few moments later, I somehow cut - or intended - a kind of porthole in the bizarre universe that enclosed me, as cleanly round as the shrinking aperture of my consciousness at the onset of my 5-Meo journey.

Through this opening the countless alien forms spontaneously came streaming, immediately metamorphosing into flowers, birds, trees, humans: Earthly life in all its wonder and heartbreaking fecundity. Then the dream faded, and I lay radiantly awake, deeply moved, feeling as though the hardest part was now over.

It had, however, just begun.

-Robert Augustus Masters, Darkness Shining Wild, pp.22-24

Robert Augustus Masters

Source: Darkness Shining Wild: An Odyssey to the Heart of Hell & Beyond: Meditations on Sanity, Suffering, Spirituality, and Liberation, Pages: 22-24

Contributed by: adastra

A Quote by Robert Augustus Masters on ego and spirituality

“Ego” as a concept has negative connotations for many spiritual seekers, for whom it is simply an impediment, an obstacle in need of eradication…Ego could be said to be a cult of one (or a self-enclosed coalition of survival-oriented habits that automatically refers to itself as “I”). This does not mean that this is evil or in need of annihilation, but rather that it's centered and unquestioningly governed by its own ideology…What is needed is not the elimination, but rather the illumination, of ego. DSW, p41

Robert Augustus Masters

Source: Darkness Shining Wild: An Odyssey to the Heart of Hell & Beyond: Meditations on Sanity, Suffering, Spirituality, and Liberation, Pages: 58

Contributed by: adastra

A Quote by Robert Augustus Masters on fear, opening, submission, surrender, ego, and transcendence

Opening to our fear is an act of intimacy, a courageous welcoming of the disfigured and outcast into the living room of our being. Opening thus is also an act of surrender. As such, it is not a dissolution - or collapsing - or personal boundaries, as in submission, but rather an expanding of them.

In submission, we deaden ourselves, sinking into the shallows; in surrender, we enliven ourselves, dying into a deeper Life. In surrender we may lose face, but we do not lose touch. Submission flattens the ego; surrender transcends it. Submission is passive, but surrender is dynamic. - Robert Augustus Masters, Darkness Shining Wild, p. 30-31

Robert Augustus Masters

Source: Darkness Shining Wild: An Odyssey to the Heart of Hell & Beyond: Meditations on Sanity, Suffering, Spirituality, and Liberation, Pages: 58

Contributed by: adastra

A Quote by Robert Augustus Masters on fear, opening, submission, surrender, ego, and transcendence

Opening to our fear is an act of intimacy, a courageous welcoming of the disfigured and outcast into the living room of our being. Opening thus is also an act of surrender. As such, it is not a dissolution - or collapsing - or personal boundaries, as in submission, but rather an expanding of them.

In submission, we deaden ourselves, sinking into the shallows; in surrender, we enliven ourselves, dying into a deeper Life. In surrender we may lose face, but we do not lose touch. Submission flattens the ego; surrender transcends it. Submission is passive, but surrender is dynamic.

Robert Augustus Masters

Source: Darkness Shining Wild: An Odyssey to the Heart of Hell & Beyond: Meditations on Sanity, Suffering, Spirituality, and Liberation, Pages: 30-31

Contributed by: adastra

A Quote by Robert Augustus Masters on ego, mortality, self-transcendence, and awakening

The sense of being somebody special (a legend in our own mind!) helps immunize “I” against the bare facticity of its own mortality, here-and-now instability, and innate insubstantialness.

Even when “I” dreams of transcending itself - as in those programs that have (or advertise) as their central agenda the eradication of ego - it is still an “I” who has now achieved the incomparable goal of self-transcendence! “Look, Ma, no ego!” we announce as we unicycle past our rapt inner audience, too proud to notice our pride, forgetting that self-conceit persists well into advanced transpersonal stages of development.

In our craving to be somebody special - and don't forget that we may find our specialness through being “nobody” - we bypass exploration of that very craving, committing far more of our passion to fulfilling our dreams than to actually awakening from them.

-Robert Augustus Masters, Darkness Shining Wild, p.58

Robert Augustus Masters

Source: Darkness Shining Wild: An Odyssey to the Heart of Hell & Beyond: Meditations on Sanity, Suffering, Spirituality, and Liberation, Pages: 58

Contributed by: adastra

A Quote by Robert Augustus Masters on paranoi, madness, integral, witness, and mindfulnessing

To journey into our paranoid thoughts and feelings without getting significantly paranoid is basic sanity in the courageous crunch. To go into our madness without becoming unhinged is a sign of relatively advanced development. To enter our pain without turning it into suffering is a gift to all beings. To pass into our lovelessness without losing heart is a great art, out of which healing cannot help but arise. To move into the Unknown without having to know what’s going to happen once we’re “there” is real freedom in the making. The way toward basic sanity is not that of rising above, trying to transcend, marginalizing, or otherwise avoiding our insanity, but rather that of going into and through our insanity, letting all that arises, however hellish or scary, awaken us to who and what we really are.

Robert Augustus Masters

Source: http://www.robertmasters.com/Blog_HTML/BLOG_Dec_07.html#locket

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Robert Augustus Masters on spirituality, what-really-matters, being, and death

When Spiritual Life Really Begins
When your honeymoon with spirituality ends - and it will end, marked by the arrival of STDs (spiritually-transmitted disappointments) - and when your affair with being spiritually correct and spiritually in-style runs dry, you may say so long to spirituality, but it is a premature goodbye.

Disillusionment with spirituality is not only inevitable but also necessary, so that spirituality might be thoroughly deglamorized.  When that disillusionment has had its say - cynicism's couch now being no more than a pain in the butt - and when your fear of re-entering the spiritual no longer frightens or disturbs you, your spiritual life really begins.

Most of the books will be gone; the ones that remain will feel like old friends you don't tire of revisiting, even if only for a page or two every couple of months.  Most of the practices will also be gone; the ones that remain will feel as natural to slip into as your favorite jeans or T-shirt, at ease with both being worn and being worn out. Most of your aspirations to be spiritual will also be gone; the few that remain will feel less like aspirations and more like unforced inhalations...

Whatever disciplines we take on will result not from one aspect of us dominating the rest, but rather from a core recognition of what is needed...Instead of being at war with our weaknesses, we bring them into our heart.  Instead of trying to get rid of what we don't like about ourselves, we develop a better relationship to it. Intimacy thus becomes more our path than transcendence.

Seeking will become supplanted by living a deeper life. Questions will still arise, but will ask for something more real than answers.  Alignment with the Real will become the ground rather than the goal. Details will cease being just details.  Focusing on what might be will yield to focusing on what's here now; that is, hope (nostalgia for the future) will be replaced by faith (radical trust in the now)....

Your longing to be fully awakened will still be present, minus the desperation and ambition that once characterized it. Where once you were in a hurry to get it, now you are not rushing or pushing, having accepted the fact that you are in it for the long haul.  Then, even when you are off track, you are on track.

Life after spirituality is the beginning of authentic spirituality.  No fireworks, no applause, no pats on the back from the Important, no need to present oneslef as someone spiritual. This is the beginning of true nobody-ness.  It is not annihilation, but revelation.  It is at once bare yet sentient openness, and also the beginning of true individuality.

For every question that arises here, Silence is the answer. Put another way, everything supplies the answer.  Nothing is explained, everything is revealed.  Beyond knowledge, Wisdom; beyond paradox, Truth; beyond self, Being; beyond everything, everything....

Life after Spirituality is committed apprenticeship to What-Really-Matters.  All that happens is the practicum. Every situation offers the same fundamental opportunity.  The teacher is everywhere. There is no freedom from our Freedom.  No escape. The implications of this froth then still the mind, awaken and release the body, ground and expose the soul, unraveling all our dreams, breaking us open to what we were born to do and be....

Life after spirituality is a constant dying. Emerging from our own ashes becomes no big deal, but just the way things are....

Robert Augustus Masters

Source: Excerpted from Robert Augustus Masters' May 2006 newsletter

Contributed by: adastra

A Quote by Robert Augustus Masters

I used to believe that I was special; I don’t now. Why? Because I know, right to my core, that we’re all in the same boat, and that it doesn’t really matter if I’m the captain or the deckhand, so long as I’m honoring both the shared humanness and the uniqueness of each, regardless of the weather.

Robert Augustus Masters

Contributed by: adastra

A Quote by Robert Augustus Masters

The more authority and power we have, the more important it is that we work, and work deeply, with our shadow elements. Paying lip service to such work just does not cut it. Real shadow-work is not some cut-and-dried intellectual process, but rather a viscerally compelling, emotionally raw journey into territories that more often than not elude any neat cartography.

Robert Augustus Masters

Contributed by: adastra

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